fbpx

LATEST NEWS

9/11 Memorial Exhibit Comes to National Veterans Memorial and Museum

Honor365 9/11 Exhibit. Presented By: National Veterans Memorial and Museum

Visit This Phoenix Hidden Gem — the World’s Largest Museum of Firefighting History

Visit This Phoenix Hidden Gem — the World’s Largest Museum of Firefighting History

STAR SPANGLED SALUTE: 9/11 INSPIRES A YOUNG MAN TO BUILD A TRIBUTE

9/11 traveling exhibit stops in Wichita

Honor365 Ceremony in Lincoln, Nebraska Recognizes Fallen Military, Law Enforcement

Memorial honoring the lives lost on 9/11 arrives in Arizona

Hall of Flame Museum in Phoenix hosting September 11 exhibit

World Trade Center replica with 360-degree view of buildings prior to 9/11 coming to Ohio

World Trade Center exhibits will stop in Columbus before the 9/11 anniversary

Honor365® Announcing Honor Walk Ceremony to Commemorate the 20th Anniversary of 9/11

Honor365® Announcing Honor Walk Ceremony to Commemorate the 20th Anniversary of 9/1

Honor walk held in Fort Worth to commemorate upcoming 20th anniversary of 9/11 attacks

Honor365® Announcing The 9/11 World Trade Center Exhibit From The Netherlands To The US.

Ogden’s Newgate Mall welcomes 9/11 exhibit, Saturday 2/20/2021

Honor365 exhibit recognizes first responders, celebrates 20 years since 9/11 in Provo, Utah 1/22/2021

9/11 rolling memorial begins nationwide trip in Utah 1/13/2021

World Trade Center replica opening at National Veterans Memorial and Museum

9/11 memorial exhibit comes to National Veterans Memorial and Museum

Honor365® Announcing Honor Walk Ceremony To Commemorate The 20th Anniversary Of 9/11 In Wichita

9/11 traveling exhibit stops in Wichita

Honor365 exhibit marking 20th anniversary of 9/11 attacks coming to Ogden mall 2/20/2021

Honor365 exhibit recognizes first responders, celebrates 20 years since 9/11 Provo, Utah USA 1/22/2021

State of Utah Governor Spencer J. Cox 1st Declaration to Honor365 1/5/20.

WTC van Deurnese Daan van der Steijn trekt vanaf medio januari door Amerika

ARC Supports 9/11 World Trade Center Memorial November 23, 2020

World Trade Center exhibit stops in Columbus ahead of 9/11 anniversary

Honor365 holds walk to honor first responder

Ceremony honors 9/11 victims as exhibit begins 20th anniversary nationwide tour 1/22/2021

Metershoge WTC-maquette van Daan (19) toert onder politiebegeleiding door Amerika in Provo, Utah USA 1/22/2021

Daan (18) did not consciously experience it himself, but commemorates the attack on the WTC with this building 1/3/2021

Twin Towers van Daan reizen door de Verenigde Staten in Provo, Utah USA 1/22/2021

9/11 Exhibit Begins 20th Anniversary Nationwide Tour In Provo 1/22/2021

Honor365 marks 20th anniversary of 9/11 terrorists attacks with exhibit.

Past Articles

Healing Field display commemorates 9/11- Sept 11, 2019- Article Link:

Fallen Provo officer among those remembered at 9/11 memorial in Sandy- Sept 11, 2019- Article Link:

Stroll Through More Than 3,000 Flags To Remember 9/11 At The Utah Healing Field 9/11 Memorial- September 11, 2019- Article Link:

Local nonprofit hoping to bring World Trade Center Exhibit to Utah Sep 11, 2020Article Link:

Utah’s 18th Annual Healing Field® Event located at the Sandy City Prominade Monday, September 9, 2019- Article Link:

VALOR – AUGUST 2019- The article about Honor365 is found on pages 6 and 7. Article Link:    IMAGE 1:  IMAGE 2:

A lifetime commitment- August 19, 2019 https://1035thearrow.com/podcasts/a-lifetime-commitment/ 

Local entrepreneurs learn the value of veteran networking- May 10, 2019 https://www.ksl.com/article/46549951/local-entrepreneurs-learn-the-value-of-veteran-networking 

Becoming more aware’: Concert in Twin Falls will benefit mental health for first responders and veterans- March 26, 2019 https://magicvalley.com/news/local/becoming-more-aware-concert-in-twin-falls-will-benefit-mental-health-for-first-responders-and/article_5b740dd2-28a8-5e54-8fe8-9c087ae1f2f1.html 

A lifetime commitment We Help a Few- https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/a-lifetime-commitment/id1456269300?i=1000447275990

Helpers who help first responders honored- November 29, 2018 https://www.murrayjournal.com/2018/11/29/184830/helpers-who-help-first-responders-honored 

HOPE Walk- December 2018 https://www.murray.utah.gov/DocumentCenter/View/9197/Mayors-MessageDec-2018  

PRESS RELEASES

Please see the press releases by city and state for information about the nationwide tour that is coming to a city near you.  Should you have any questions, please contact us at media.honor365@gmail.com.  Thank you.

Latest Press Releases

March 25, 2021 Phoenix, AZ Office of Mayor Kate Gallego- Congratulations on the arrival of the 9/11 Memorial exhibit in Phoenix!- PDF:

March, 20, 2021 Las Vegas, NV Press Release- Honor365® Announcing the 9/11 World Trade Center Exhibit via ‘Hero 1’ from The Netherlands to The United States of America-PDF:

March 20, 2021 Phoenix, AZ Press Release- Honor365® Announcing the 9/11 World Trade Center Exhibit via ‘Hero 1’ from The Netherlands to The United States of America-PDF:

March 20, 2021 Lincoln, NE Press Release- Honor365® Announcing the 9/11 World Trade Center Exhibit via ‘Hero 1’ from The Netherlands to The United States of America-PDF:

Jan 27, 2021 Ogden, UT Press Release- Honor365® Announcing the 9/11 World Trade Center Exhibit via ‘Hero 1’ from The Netherlands to The United States of America- PDF:

Jan 19, 2021 Provo, UT Press Release- Honor365® Announcing the 9/11 World Trade Center Exhibit via ‘Hero 1’ from The Netherlands to The United States of America- PDF:

Jan 8, 2021 Honor365 Galveston Press Release- Honor365® Announcing the 9/11 World Trade Center Exhibit via ‘Hero 1’ from The Netherlands to The United States of America- PDF:

Jan 5, 2021 Honor365 Salt Lake City Press Release- Honor365® Announcing the 9/11 World Trade Center Exhibit via ‘Hero 1’ from The Netherlands to The United States of America- PDF:

Jan 3, 2021 Provo UT Press Release- Honor365® Announcing the 9/11 World Trade Center Exhibit via ‘Hero 1’ from The Netherlands to The United States of America- PDF:

Media INQUIRIES

For media inquiries, please contact Honor365 at media.honor365@gmail.com  

For logo requests and other graphic and digital marketing materials, please contact Honor365 at honorvet365@gmail.com 

Honor365 is a leader in the nonprofit sector in building trust through all we do. This bond of trust goes beyond legal or regulatory requirements to include transparency, a core value we feel that is important. We believe transparency is a key element in all that we do. Please feel free to go to https://commerce.utah.gov/for further information about our organization.  It is our hope that doing so demonstrates our commitment to public accountability for the financial stewardship of the assets our donors have entrusted to us. 

Check out our Frequently Asked Questions Link Here

Alan Basso died while on-duty from a heart attack after two emergency calls. Alan had a 36-year firefighting career including five years as a seasonal firefighter with the Department of Natural Resources, one year with Washington State University, over two years with Kalama Fire as a career firefighter, 21 years as a Kalama Fire volunteer and captain and more than 21 years as a firefighter and lieutenant for the Longview Fire Department. Alan was a port commissioner at the Port of Kalama for eight years and garnered a long list of accomplishments for which he will be remembered including being the quintessential small-town guy with a heart matched only by his larger-than-life personality. He also served as a substitute teacher for Kalama School District, a part time county juvenile detention officer and a volunteer for youth fundraisers and events like the Kalama Chinooks and Operation Warm Coats for Kids. Alan loved spending time with his family and friends, WSU football, trips to Hawaii, camping, traveling and teasing the girls in the family.⁠
⁠
We honor you, Alan Basso.⁠
⁠
#Repost @http://www.national-ems-memorial.org/honorees/entry/9/1219/ Photo @https://tdn.com/news/local/firefighter-kalama-port-commissioner-alan-basso-dies-friday/article_83f4b759-d897-52e9-b80d-874c885fb962.html⁠
⁠
#honor365 #honorvet365 #rememberingtheone #Firstresponder #firefighter #fallenhero

Alan Basso died while on-duty from a heart attack after two emergency calls. Alan had a 36-year firefighting career including five years as a seasonal firefighter with the Department of Natural Resources, one year with Washington State University, over two years with Kalama Fire as a career firefighter, 21 years as a Kalama Fire volunteer and captain and more than 21 years as a firefighter and lieutenant for the Longview Fire Department. Alan was a port commissioner at the Port of Kalama for eight years and garnered a long list of accomplishments for which he will be remembered including being the quintessential small-town guy with a heart matched only by his larger-than-life personality. He also served as a substitute teacher for Kalama School District, a part time county juvenile detention officer and a volunteer for youth fundraisers and events like the Kalama Chinooks and Operation Warm Coats for Kids. Alan loved spending time with his family and friends, WSU football, trips to Hawaii, camping, traveling and teasing the girls in the family.⁠

We honor you, Alan Basso.⁠

#Repost @http://www.national-ems-memorial.org/honorees/entry/9/1219/ Photo @https://tdn.com/news/local/firefighter-kalama-port-commissioner-alan-basso-dies-friday/article_83f4b759-d897-52e9-b80d-874c885fb962.html⁠

#honor365 #honorvet365 #rememberingtheone #Firstresponder #firefighter #fallenhero
...

6 0
Lt. Norma Adams, of Adams, Nebraska, was a member of the Civil Air Patrol during World War II. She got her pilot's license at 17, in 1041. Two years later, she died along with a mechanic on a test flight near the airport in Crete. [In May 2021], her living relatives - two nieces and two nephews - [were] presented with the Congressional Gold Medal, honoring Adams' wartime service, which included ferrying new military aircraft to delivery bases.⁠
⁠
We honor you, Norma Adams.⁠
⁠
#Repost @https://norfolkdailynews.com/state/nebraska/family-of-nebraska-woman-pilot-who-perished-in-wwii-crash-will-receive-congressional-gold-medal/article_2fcc1cb0-1153-541f-afd2-dc4eedccb70f.html#1⁠
⁠
#honor365 #honorvet365 #rememberingtheone #veteran #civilairpatrol #Airforce #KIA #fallenhero #Congressionalgoldmedal

Lt. Norma Adams, of Adams, Nebraska, was a member of the Civil Air Patrol during World War II. She got her pilot's license at 17, in 1041. Two years later, she died along with a mechanic on a test flight near the airport in Crete. [In May 2021], her living relatives - two nieces and two nephews - [were] presented with the Congressional Gold Medal, honoring Adams' wartime service, which included ferrying new military aircraft to delivery bases.⁠

We honor you, Norma Adams.⁠

#Repost @https://norfolkdailynews.com/state/nebraska/family-of-nebraska-woman-pilot-who-perished-in-wwii-crash-will-receive-congressional-gold-medal/article_2fcc1cb0-1153-541f-afd2-dc4eedccb70f.html#1⁠

#honor365 #honorvet365 #rememberingtheone #veteran #civilairpatrol #Airforce #KIA #fallenhero #Congressionalgoldmedal
...

17 1
Honor365’s nationwide tour came to a close this week after 9 months.  It was an amazing journey. 

We are so thankful for the opportunity we had to meet so many amazing people across the The United States of America as we focused on the well being of those we serve and support and commemorated the 20th Anniversary of 9/11.  This we know, “From Darkness Light Prevails.”

Thank you to Daan for giving Honor365 the opportunity to share his replica as we traveled with the exhibit.  While the final destination for the replica was not in NYC, it was on display in Columbus, Ohio for the 20th Anniversary and we know it was well received.  We wish Daan continued success in his future.

To the numerous people involved in the Honor365 Honor Walk and Connect & Honor events in every city we visited, thank you kindly.  There were so many beautiful examples of kindness and love expressed before, during and after these ceremonies.  All of you have left footprints on our hearts forever.

To the Flight 93 Memorial, Arlington National Cemetery, Pentagon, and NYC, thank you so much for providing us the humbling experience of connecting and honoring the fallen and their families at the memorials and at your departments.  We will never forget and look forward to seeing you again in the future.

We express our deepest gratitude to the countless people who participated in numerous ways to support our efforts.  So many volunteers across the Nation were involved in order to accomplish the tasks at hand to successfully achieve a nationwide tour.  Thank you so much for your tremendous support and we applaud you for your deep commitment to service before self.  When they say, “it takes an Army,” this is complete truth.

To our sponsors, thank you very much for your support and dedication to our mission and vision.  We couldn’t have done it without you. 

The strength and resiliency of Americans is beautiful.  We discovered over and over again the power of the American spirit this year during these most unprecedented times. 

We look forward to what the future holds as we continue to support veterans, first responders, and their families.

Honor365’s nationwide tour came to a close this week after 9 months. It was an amazing journey.

We are so thankful for the opportunity we had to meet so many amazing people across the The United States of America as we focused on the well being of those we serve and support and commemorated the 20th Anniversary of 9/11. This we know, “From Darkness Light Prevails.”

Thank you to Daan for giving Honor365 the opportunity to share his replica as we traveled with the exhibit. While the final destination for the replica was not in NYC, it was on display in Columbus, Ohio for the 20th Anniversary and we know it was well received. We wish Daan continued success in his future.

To the numerous people involved in the Honor365 Honor Walk and Connect & Honor events in every city we visited, thank you kindly. There were so many beautiful examples of kindness and love expressed before, during and after these ceremonies. All of you have left footprints on our hearts forever.

To the Flight 93 Memorial, Arlington National Cemetery, Pentagon, and NYC, thank you so much for providing us the humbling experience of connecting and honoring the fallen and their families at the memorials and at your departments. We will never forget and look forward to seeing you again in the future.

We express our deepest gratitude to the countless people who participated in numerous ways to support our efforts. So many volunteers across the Nation were involved in order to accomplish the tasks at hand to successfully achieve a nationwide tour. Thank you so much for your tremendous support and we applaud you for your deep commitment to service before self. When they say, “it takes an Army,” this is complete truth.

To our sponsors, thank you very much for your support and dedication to our mission and vision. We couldn’t have done it without you.

The strength and resiliency of Americans is beautiful. We discovered over and over again the power of the American spirit this year during these most unprecedented times.

We look forward to what the future holds as we continue to support veterans, first responders, and their families.
...

8 3
A 23-year-old soldier from Oberlin died Wednesday [Aug 22, 2012]  in San Antonio, Texas, after being injured Aug. 6 while on duty in Kandahar, Afghanistan.

Sgt. Louis R. Torres was injured by "an enemy improvised explosive device," according to a news release from the Department of Defense.

"He was very outgoing, very much a leader," said his mother, Armanda Ellis. "He loved fighting for his country."

The decorated soldier joined the Army in June 2008 after graduating from Lorain County Joint Vocation School in Oberlin. While at JVS he played football and took classes in law enforcement and security.

Ellis remembers that even as a 5- or 6-year-old Torres loved to play with military men. He was also a history buff, sitting in front of the television watching the History Channel, learning about various wars and battles.

Two weeks after graduating, Torres told his mother that he needed his birth certificate because he had joined the Army.

Torres immediately started training at Fort Benning in Georgia. By October 2008 he was stationed at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington. He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 3rd Infantry Regiment, 3rd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division.

He was deployed to Iraq from August 2009 from June 2010. He deployed with his brigade to Afghanistan last December, according to Department of Defense. He had just more than a month remaining on his tour.

Torres had just visited his family in Oberlin at the end of June. He returned to duty July 2, a few days before his birthday on July 5.

Ellis said that her other son, Alberto Torres, 24, who was also stationed in Afghanistan, was told by officials that his brother had been injured. He accompanied Torres to Germany before being transferred to San Antonio. 

"He was a leader, not a follower," his mother said. "He was very kind-hearted and a great son. He was always thinking of me. He made sure that I was on Facebook so he could tell me Happy Mother's Day and Valentine's Day."

We honor you, Louis Torres.

#Repost @https://www.cleveland.com/metro/2012/08/sgt_louis_r_torres_of_oberlin.html

#honor365 #honorvet365 #rememberingtheone #veteran #army #fallenhero #purpleheart

A 23-year-old soldier from Oberlin died Wednesday [Aug 22, 2012] in San Antonio, Texas, after being injured Aug. 6 while on duty in Kandahar, Afghanistan.

Sgt. Louis R. Torres was injured by "an enemy improvised explosive device," according to a news release from the Department of Defense.

"He was very outgoing, very much a leader," said his mother, Armanda Ellis. "He loved fighting for his country."

The decorated soldier joined the Army in June 2008 after graduating from Lorain County Joint Vocation School in Oberlin. While at JVS he played football and took classes in law enforcement and security.

Ellis remembers that even as a 5- or 6-year-old Torres loved to play with military men. He was also a history buff, sitting in front of the television watching the History Channel, learning about various wars and battles.

Two weeks after graduating, Torres told his mother that he needed his birth certificate because he had joined the Army.

Torres immediately started training at Fort Benning in Georgia. By October 2008 he was stationed at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington. He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 3rd Infantry Regiment, 3rd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division.

He was deployed to Iraq from August 2009 from June 2010. He deployed with his brigade to Afghanistan last December, according to Department of Defense. He had just more than a month remaining on his tour.

Torres had just visited his family in Oberlin at the end of June. He returned to duty July 2, a few days before his birthday on July 5.

Ellis said that her other son, Alberto Torres, 24, who was also stationed in Afghanistan, was told by officials that his brother had been injured. He accompanied Torres to Germany before being transferred to San Antonio.

"He was a leader, not a follower," his mother said. "He was very kind-hearted and a great son. He was always thinking of me. He made sure that I was on Facebook so he could tell me Happy Mother's Day and Valentine's Day."

We honor you, Louis Torres.

#Repost @https://www.cleveland.com/metro/2012/08/sgt_louis_r_torres_of_oberlin.html

#honor365 #honorvet365 #rememberingtheone #veteran #army #fallenhero #purpleheart
...

10 3
A 2002 graduate of Northwestern High School in West Salem, John M. Runkle, Jr. enlisted in the Army in 2006, and was eventually stationed in Korea with the 2D Infantry, 102D Military Intelligence Battalion, 2D Brigade Combat Team. While there, he decided he wanted to go to the United States Military Academy at West Point. However, he was first deployed to Iraq for 10 months before starting with the class of 2009. He graduated in the top 10 percent of his class.⁠
⁠
Lt. Runkle served with the Pathfinders of the 4th Battalion, 101st Aviation Regiment, 159th Combat Aviation Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault); based at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. He earned his Ranger Tab before being deployed to Afghanistan in 2011. First Lieutenant John M. Runkle, age 27, was killed in Afghanistan on 26th of May, 2011, when his unit was struck by an improvised explosive device in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan.⁠
⁠
We honor John Runkle Jr.⁠
⁠
#Repost @https://fallen15.com/1st-lt-john-m-runkle-jr/⁠
⁠
#honor365 #honorvet365 #rememberingtheone #veteran #army #bronzestar #purpleheart #KIA #fallenhero

A 2002 graduate of Northwestern High School in West Salem, John M. Runkle, Jr. enlisted in the Army in 2006, and was eventually stationed in Korea with the 2D Infantry, 102D Military Intelligence Battalion, 2D Brigade Combat Team. While there, he decided he wanted to go to the United States Military Academy at West Point. However, he was first deployed to Iraq for 10 months before starting with the class of 2009. He graduated in the top 10 percent of his class.⁠

Lt. Runkle served with the Pathfinders of the 4th Battalion, 101st Aviation Regiment, 159th Combat Aviation Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault); based at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. He earned his Ranger Tab before being deployed to Afghanistan in 2011. First Lieutenant John M. Runkle, age 27, was killed in Afghanistan on 26th of May, 2011, when his unit was struck by an improvised explosive device in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan.⁠

We honor John Runkle Jr.⁠

#Repost @https://fallen15.com/1st-lt-john-m-runkle-jr/⁠

#honor365 #honorvet365 #rememberingtheone #veteran #army #bronzestar #purpleheart #KIA #fallenhero
...

16 5
Andrew (Sonny) Garcia savored family life and exuded a deep sense of spirituality and concern for others. Garcia grew up in Sunnyvale, California, and graduated from San Jose State University.  former air traffic controller with the California Air National Guard and briefly, a purchasing manager for United Airlines, Garcia ran an industrial products supply business, Cinco Group, with his wife [Dorothy]. Though he never earned a pilot’s license, he was fascinated with aviation and airplanes. On September 11, he was returning home from a business meeting in New Jersey.

Dorothy told investigators that the only thing she wanted from the wreckage was her husband's wedding ring. They would know it, she said, from the cursive inscription inside: "All my love, 8-2-69," the date of their wedding.

"It was symbolic of Andy and of our love," Dorothy said of the ring. "I just wanted it back."

All promised to do their best but said the odds of finding so small a needle in so large a haystack were slim. Dorothy held out hope, praying endlessly with her prayer group for its return.

"There were nine or 10 people praying hard for its recovery," Dorothy said. "I kept praying and believing it would come back."

Dorothy's faith was rewarded on December 17,2001 when the phone rang.

"I have some news for you," an FBI agent told her. Dorothy immediately knew that the ring had been found. The agent promised to return it as soon as possible. Two days later, two agents knocked on her door. They handed her a small white box. Inside, wrapped in tissue secured with a gold seal and a white ribbon, was her husband's wallet, card holder, luggage tag, credit cards and driver's license.
And a small purple velvet pouch containing a ring. Dorothy's face lit up when she saw the inscription.

"All my love, 8-2-69."

"It's absolutely perfect," Dorothy said. "It looks just like he took it off his hand and put it on mine."

We honor you, Andrew Garcia.

#Repost @https://www.nps.gov/flni/learn/historyculture/andrew-sonny-garcia.htm  and @https://brock911.fandom.com/wiki/Andrew_Garcia

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #veteran #AirNationalGuard #kia #fallenhero #911

Andrew (Sonny) Garcia savored family life and exuded a deep sense of spirituality and concern for others. Garcia grew up in Sunnyvale, California, and graduated from San Jose State University. former air traffic controller with the California Air National Guard and briefly, a purchasing manager for United Airlines, Garcia ran an industrial products supply business, Cinco Group, with his wife [Dorothy]. Though he never earned a pilot’s license, he was fascinated with aviation and airplanes. On September 11, he was returning home from a business meeting in New Jersey.

Dorothy told investigators that the only thing she wanted from the wreckage was her husband's wedding ring. They would know it, she said, from the cursive inscription inside: "All my love, 8-2-69," the date of their wedding.

"It was symbolic of Andy and of our love," Dorothy said of the ring. "I just wanted it back."

All promised to do their best but said the odds of finding so small a needle in so large a haystack were slim. Dorothy held out hope, praying endlessly with her prayer group for its return.

"There were nine or 10 people praying hard for its recovery," Dorothy said. "I kept praying and believing it would come back."

Dorothy's faith was rewarded on December 17,2001 when the phone rang.

"I have some news for you," an FBI agent told her. Dorothy immediately knew that the ring had been found. The agent promised to return it as soon as possible. Two days later, two agents knocked on her door. They handed her a small white box. Inside, wrapped in tissue secured with a gold seal and a white ribbon, was her husband's wallet, card holder, luggage tag, credit cards and driver's license.
And a small purple velvet pouch containing a ring. Dorothy's face lit up when she saw the inscription.

"All my love, 8-2-69."

"It's absolutely perfect," Dorothy said. "It looks just like he took it off his hand and put it on mine."

We honor you, Andrew Garcia.

#Repost @https://www.nps.gov/flni/learn/historyculture/andrew-sonny-garcia.htm and @https://brock911.fandom.com/wiki/Andrew_Garcia

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #veteran #AirNationalGuard #kia #fallenhero #911
...

9 2
Today we Remember the One. Today we Remember Them All.⁠
⁠
We remember the 344 Firefighters and 72 Law Enforcement Officers who fearlessly ran into those burning buildings while everyone else was running out and away. Never to return.⁠
⁠
We remember the 55 military personnel who died in the Pentagon.⁠
⁠
We remember the 2,507 innocent civilians who died needlessly in the World Trade Centers and surrounding buildings, inside the Pentagon, and on board flights American Airlines 11, United Airlines 175, American Airlines 77, and United Airlines 93. ⁠
⁠
We remember those who dug through the rubble for the days and weeks following the attacks, in efforts to find survivors and remains of casualties, ultimately exposing themselves to toxins that caused severe illnesses and premature deaths in the years to follow.⁠
⁠
We will Never Forget.⁠
⁠
We honor you.⁠
⁠
Statistical sources @https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casualties_of_the_September_11_attacks ⁠
⁠
#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #LEO #EMT #veteran #kia #fallenhero #911 ⁠

Today we Remember the One. Today we Remember Them All.⁠

We remember the 344 Firefighters and 72 Law Enforcement Officers who fearlessly ran into those burning buildings while everyone else was running out and away. Never to return.⁠

We remember the 55 military personnel who died in the Pentagon.⁠

We remember the 2,507 innocent civilians who died needlessly in the World Trade Centers and surrounding buildings, inside the Pentagon, and on board flights American Airlines 11, United Airlines 175, American Airlines 77, and United Airlines 93. ⁠

We remember those who dug through the rubble for the days and weeks following the attacks, in efforts to find survivors and remains of casualties, ultimately exposing themselves to toxins that caused severe illnesses and premature deaths in the years to follow.⁠

We will Never Forget.⁠

We honor you.⁠

Statistical sources @https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casualties_of_the_September_11_attacks ⁠

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #LEO #EMT #veteran #kia #fallenhero #911 ⁠
...

11 1
"He was no saint!" said Eugene Whelan's mother, Joan, her laughter bubbling up. "Yeah, he could be a giant pain!" her husband, Alfred, added, chuckling about the ninth of their 10 children.⁠
⁠
But examples eluded them.⁠
⁠
While Firefighter Whelan, 31, undoubtedly jettisoned saint eligibility at some Rockaway pub or Grateful Dead concert — a captain called him "the king of fun" — he was still terrific. He kept extra winter jackets in his Jeep in case he spotted a shivering homeless person. He was a persistent serial hugger, spreading those burly embraces known as "Eugene hugs."⁠
⁠
He was a Mr. Fix-it and human Velcro to kids. In Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, the neighborhood served by Engine Company 230, children would arrive at the firehouse with broken bicycles for Firefighter Whelan to make whole.⁠
⁠
During a school visit, he asked why one child was left in the bus. The child was paralyzed, a teacher replied. Mr. Whelan carried the child to the fire truck. "He understood what life was really about," said his father, "so we feel pretty good about him."⁠
⁠
We honor you, Eugene Whelan.⁠
⁠
Profile published in THE NEW YORK TIMES on December 23, 2001. #Repost @http://heroportraits.org/Gallery/default.aspx?id=337⁠
⁠
#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #911 ⁠

"He was no saint!" said Eugene Whelan's mother, Joan, her laughter bubbling up. "Yeah, he could be a giant pain!" her husband, Alfred, added, chuckling about the ninth of their 10 children.⁠

But examples eluded them.⁠

While Firefighter Whelan, 31, undoubtedly jettisoned saint eligibility at some Rockaway pub or Grateful Dead concert — a captain called him "the king of fun" — he was still terrific. He kept extra winter jackets in his Jeep in case he spotted a shivering homeless person. He was a persistent serial hugger, spreading those burly embraces known as "Eugene hugs."⁠

He was a Mr. Fix-it and human Velcro to kids. In Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, the neighborhood served by Engine Company 230, children would arrive at the firehouse with broken bicycles for Firefighter Whelan to make whole.⁠

During a school visit, he asked why one child was left in the bus. The child was paralyzed, a teacher replied. Mr. Whelan carried the child to the fire truck. "He understood what life was really about," said his father, "so we feel pretty good about him."⁠

We honor you, Eugene Whelan.⁠

Profile published in THE NEW YORK TIMES on December 23, 2001. #Repost @http://heroportraits.org/Gallery/default.aspx?id=337⁠

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #911 ⁠
...

8 1
When Army Sgt. Maj. Gilbert Morales talks about his friend and colleague, Sgt. Maj. Larry Strickland, he can't help but make a baseball analogy to the Baltimore Orioles' legendary shortstop.⁠
⁠
"He was the Cal Ripken of our career field, a real icon," says Morales. "There is no real replacing him."⁠
⁠
Like Ripken, Strickland was planning to retire at the end of September. He had served 30 years in the Army, rising to the highest rank an enlisted man or woman can attain—sergeant major—and for the last 10 years was a personnel adviser to a series of three-star generals in the Pentagon.⁠
Strickland was an advocate for enlisted men and women amid the top brass of the Pentagon as they set policy on everything from promotions to pay raises to family leave.⁠
"He did not hesitate to go to a three-star general and tell him, 'You are about to make a mistake.' That was his job. And he obviously did it well, since we went through four or five generals and each time we got a new one, he asked Larry to stay," says Martha Carden, a civilian Pentagon employee who was Strickland's friend and officemate for 11 years.⁠
⁠
Only 19 days away from retirement, Strickland came to his Pentagon office on Sept. 11 even though he didn't have to be there, Morales says. Because he was retiring, he needed to use up his annual leave or he would lose it. But he came in anyway, Morales recalls, because there was going to be an important briefing the next day on Army transformation. "He wanted to make sure those briefings were right," the sergeant major says.⁠
⁠
But the former UW student never made it to the briefings or his retirement. On that day American Airlines Flight 77, commandeered by terrorists, crashed into the west side of the Pentagon where he was working. ⁠
⁠
Strickland, 52, is survived by his wife, Debra, a sergeant major at Ft. Belvoir, Va.; three children; Julie, Matthew and Chris; and a year-old grandson, Brendan.⁠
⁠
We honor you, Larry Strickland.⁠
⁠
#Repost @https://www.washington.edu/alumni/columns/dec01/911_strickland.html ⁠
⁠
#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #veteran #army #kia #fallenhero #911⁠

When Army Sgt. Maj. Gilbert Morales talks about his friend and colleague, Sgt. Maj. Larry Strickland, he can't help but make a baseball analogy to the Baltimore Orioles' legendary shortstop.⁠

"He was the Cal Ripken of our career field, a real icon," says Morales. "There is no real replacing him."⁠

Like Ripken, Strickland was planning to retire at the end of September. He had served 30 years in the Army, rising to the highest rank an enlisted man or woman can attain—sergeant major—and for the last 10 years was a personnel adviser to a series of three-star generals in the Pentagon.⁠
Strickland was an advocate for enlisted men and women amid the top brass of the Pentagon as they set policy on everything from promotions to pay raises to family leave.⁠
"He did not hesitate to go to a three-star general and tell him, 'You are about to make a mistake.' That was his job. And he obviously did it well, since we went through four or five generals and each time we got a new one, he asked Larry to stay," says Martha Carden, a civilian Pentagon employee who was Strickland's friend and officemate for 11 years.⁠

Only 19 days away from retirement, Strickland came to his Pentagon office on Sept. 11 even though he didn't have to be there, Morales says. Because he was retiring, he needed to use up his annual leave or he would lose it. But he came in anyway, Morales recalls, because there was going to be an important briefing the next day on Army transformation. "He wanted to make sure those briefings were right," the sergeant major says.⁠

But the former UW student never made it to the briefings or his retirement. On that day American Airlines Flight 77, commandeered by terrorists, crashed into the west side of the Pentagon where he was working. ⁠

Strickland, 52, is survived by his wife, Debra, a sergeant major at Ft. Belvoir, Va.; three children; Julie, Matthew and Chris; and a year-old grandson, Brendan.⁠

We honor you, Larry Strickland.⁠

#Repost @https://www.washington.edu/alumni/columns/dec01/911_strickland.html ⁠

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #veteran #army #kia #fallenhero #911⁠
...

12 3

Financial Assistance
Additional Assistance #211
Medical or Other Services Link
Fund a Project Link
Privacy Policy