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our mission & vision

Our Mission:
To provide resource and referral services for veterans, first responders, and their families.
Our Vision:
A world without suicide.
Our Pillars:
Education, Employment, Healthcare, Housing
Our Cause:
Proceeds support mental wellness for veterans, first responders, and their families.

WHAT WE DO

EDUCATION

Honor365 is partnered with education institutions and existing programs to help veterans and first responders reach their education goals.

EMPLOYMENT

Honor365 is providing resource and referral services for veterans and first responders for gainful employment.

HEALTHCARE

Honor365 is partnered with private industry and public institutions to provide free services in outpatient therapy for veterans, first responders, and their families.

HOUSING

Honor365 is partnered with companies to help veterans and first responders find affordable housing while improving the needs of their home.

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Percentage of veterans who were unemployed in November 2020.

%

The percentage of full-time student veterans who dropped out of college enrollment in 2017.

%

In 2019, there was a 2.1% decrease in the estimated number of homeless veterans nationwide. 793 veterans now have shelter.

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During a 20-year period, the total suicide rate in the United States increased 35% from 10.5% per 100,000 in 1999 to 14.2% per 100,000 per 100,000 in 2018.

About Us

Honor365™ is dedicated to honoring and serving our veterans, first responders and their families. It’s through donations and sponsorships that we are able to continue providing life-changing events and services to veterans and first responders in need. Please donate today so that we can continue our mission and serve those and their families who have so bravely served us.

Our Partners

Our partners have an integral part of our success. Consider becoming a partner with Honor365 to make a difference in the lives of veterans, first responders, and their families.

Video Gallery

Check out our video gallery to experience our events that support our veterans, first responders, and their families.

Matt Frantz, the second of four boys, was born June 8, 1971, in St. Paul, Minnesota. Later, his family moved back to Duluth, where he remained until his death.⁠
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As a child, Matt would listen to the stories his grandfather would tell about his career as a firefighter for the Air National Guard and later a founding member and chief of the Rice Lake Volunteer Fire Department. It was at a young age that he developed a passion for firefighting and knew that this was what he truly wanted to do in life.⁠
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Matt served in the U.S. Army from 1991 to 1993, during which time he served abroad in Korea. He later served as a reservist in the Army National Guard, achieving the rank of sergeant and retiring in 1999.⁠
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Matt attended Lake Superior College School of Fire Technology and Administration and began working for UPS as a local sorter, later becoming a full-time delivery driver.⁠
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We met in early 1995, and in August of 1998 we were married. In 1999, he adopted our oldest daughter and we had our second daughter. He was so proud of his girls and loved spending time with them.⁠
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We moved to Rice Lake Township in 2000, and Matt joined the volunteer fire department soon after. In 2009, Matt was elected chief and held the position up until the time of his death.⁠
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He had a deep passion for this particular organization and cause, and all who knew him could see it. Some of his closest and dearest friendships were formed with the men and women he fought fires with. He was a dedicated chief and wanted every member to feel that they were a part of something special, part of a family.⁠
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Matt was a do-it-yourselfer and was proud of the home he built for us. If he didn’t know how to do something he played around with it until he succeeded. He loved fishing, hunting, and camping and absolutely loved to do these things with his family, especially our daughters.⁠
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We honor you, Matthew Frantz.⁠
⁠
#Repost @https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/matthew-c-frantz/⁠
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#honor365 #honorvet365 #rememberingtheone #firstresponder #firefighter #veteran

Matt Frantz, the second of four boys, was born June 8, 1971, in St. Paul, Minnesota. Later, his family moved back to Duluth, where he remained until his death.⁠

As a child, Matt would listen to the stories his grandfather would tell about his career as a firefighter for the Air National Guard and later a founding member and chief of the Rice Lake Volunteer Fire Department. It was at a young age that he developed a passion for firefighting and knew that this was what he truly wanted to do in life.⁠

Matt served in the U.S. Army from 1991 to 1993, during which time he served abroad in Korea. He later served as a reservist in the Army National Guard, achieving the rank of sergeant and retiring in 1999.⁠

Matt attended Lake Superior College School of Fire Technology and Administration and began working for UPS as a local sorter, later becoming a full-time delivery driver.⁠

We met in early 1995, and in August of 1998 we were married. In 1999, he adopted our oldest daughter and we had our second daughter. He was so proud of his girls and loved spending time with them.⁠

We moved to Rice Lake Township in 2000, and Matt joined the volunteer fire department soon after. In 2009, Matt was elected chief and held the position up until the time of his death.⁠

He had a deep passion for this particular organization and cause, and all who knew him could see it. Some of his closest and dearest friendships were formed with the men and women he fought fires with. He was a dedicated chief and wanted every member to feel that they were a part of something special, part of a family.⁠

Matt was a do-it-yourselfer and was proud of the home he built for us. If he didn’t know how to do something he played around with it until he succeeded. He loved fishing, hunting, and camping and absolutely loved to do these things with his family, especially our daughters.⁠

We honor you, Matthew Frantz.⁠

#Repost @https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/matthew-c-frantz/⁠

#honor365 #honorvet365 #rememberingtheone #firstresponder #firefighter #veteran
...

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CPL Harwood Hobbs Thompson⁠
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Corporal Thompson was a member of Company G, 2nd Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division. During the intense fighting near Chipyong-ni, South Korea, he was listed as Missing in Action on February 15, 1951. Later it was determined that he had been taken Prisoner of War and was killed while a prisoner from aerial strafing on May 19, 1951. His remains were not recovered. ⁠
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We honor you, Harwood Thompson.⁠
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#Repost @https://www.koreanwar.org/html/29960/korean-war-project-vermont-er12246138-cpl-harwood-hobbs-thompson⁠
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#honor365 #honorvet365 #rememberingtheone #veteran #Koreanwar #POW #KIA #fallenhero

CPL Harwood Hobbs Thompson⁠

Corporal Thompson was a member of Company G, 2nd Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division. During the intense fighting near Chipyong-ni, South Korea, he was listed as Missing in Action on February 15, 1951. Later it was determined that he had been taken Prisoner of War and was killed while a prisoner from aerial strafing on May 19, 1951. His remains were not recovered. ⁠

We honor you, Harwood Thompson.⁠

#Repost @https://www.koreanwar.org/html/29960/korean-war-project-vermont-er12246138-cpl-harwood-hobbs-thompson⁠

#honor365 #honorvet365 #rememberingtheone #veteran #Koreanwar #POW #KIA #fallenhero
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It’s hard to believe what Army Staff Sgt. David Bellavia went through and did in order to save his squad in Iraq during the Second Battle of Fallujah on Nov. 10, 2004. It’s unbelievable how much he turned his life around from feeling like the “weakest link” — his words, not ours — to leading his soldiers during a pitched firefight in one of the deadliest battles of the Iraq War. ⁠
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In February 2004, Bellavia deployed with the 2nd Battalion 2nd infantry regiment, 1st Infantry Division. They were stationed outside Fallujah, and Bellavia was a squad leader, one who would soon be leading his men into hellish combat.⁠
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His platoon was tasked with searching and clearing houses in Fallujah; a brutal and costly affair. They went block by block, house by house, and room by room in a city crawling with enemy fighters, one that was laced with booby traps, with ambushes around every corner. By the time that U.S. troops made their way into the city in November, they had already been engaged in months of fierce fighting. Bellavia was no longer bothered by fear at this point; he was fueled by it. By this time, he had transformed into a reliable leader who was ready for whatever this war could throw at him.⁠
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On Nov. 10, 2004, while clearing a house, Bellavia pursued a group of ambushers through the building in a running battle that would end with one soldier taking out a group of attackers many times his number. For his actions, Bellavia was awarded the Medal of Honor on June 25, 2019.⁠
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We honor you, David Bellavia.⁠
⁠
#Repost @https://taskandpurpose.com/history/david-bellavia-medal-of-honor-video/⁠
⁠
#honor365 #honorvet365 #rememberingtheone #veteran #army #medalofhonor #bronzestar

It’s hard to believe what Army Staff Sgt. David Bellavia went through and did in order to save his squad in Iraq during the Second Battle of Fallujah on Nov. 10, 2004. It’s unbelievable how much he turned his life around from feeling like the “weakest link” — his words, not ours — to leading his soldiers during a pitched firefight in one of the deadliest battles of the Iraq War. ⁠

In February 2004, Bellavia deployed with the 2nd Battalion 2nd infantry regiment, 1st Infantry Division. They were stationed outside Fallujah, and Bellavia was a squad leader, one who would soon be leading his men into hellish combat.⁠

His platoon was tasked with searching and clearing houses in Fallujah; a brutal and costly affair. They went block by block, house by house, and room by room in a city crawling with enemy fighters, one that was laced with booby traps, with ambushes around every corner. By the time that U.S. troops made their way into the city in November, they had already been engaged in months of fierce fighting. Bellavia was no longer bothered by fear at this point; he was fueled by it. By this time, he had transformed into a reliable leader who was ready for whatever this war could throw at him.⁠

On Nov. 10, 2004, while clearing a house, Bellavia pursued a group of ambushers through the building in a running battle that would end with one soldier taking out a group of attackers many times his number. For his actions, Bellavia was awarded the Medal of Honor on June 25, 2019.⁠

We honor you, David Bellavia.⁠

#Repost @https://taskandpurpose.com/history/david-bellavia-medal-of-honor-video/⁠

#honor365 #honorvet365 #rememberingtheone #veteran #army #medalofhonor #bronzestar
...

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"I was the second man off my barge, and the first and third man got killed."⁠
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Born in Highland Falls, New York, Charles Durning was the ninth of ten children. Five of his siblings died due to scarlet fever and smallpox, and much of his early life was spent in hardship. Although he displayed a passion for entertaining others, a high school teacher told him that he was talentless in art, language, and math and was better suited to working in an office. He was undeterred, however, and would become one of the greatest character actors in living memory.⁠
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Durning was drafted into the U.S. Army just in time to fight in World War II. He was part of the landing forces at Normandy during the initial invasion of France by Allied forces. Although he survived the initial assault relatively unscathed, he was wounded by a German mine a few days later and earned a Purple Heart. After recovering for six months, he was put back on the front lines to combat the German Ardennes offensive.⁠
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During the German attack, Durning reported that a particularly young soldier charged him, but Durning couldn’t bring himself to fire. The two fought with their bayonets, and Durning suffered further injury during the fight. Durning killed the German infantryman which became a particularly painful memory. After the offensive, Durning received his second Purple Heart.⁠
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Before the war was over, Durning received a third Purple Heart and the Silver and Bronze Stars for valor. The chest wound which earned him the Purple Heart prompted his evacuation to the United States for recovery where he spent the remainder of his time with the Army. He was discharged in 1946 as a private first class.⁠
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We honor you, Charles Durning.⁠
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#Repost @https://www.military.com/veteran-jobs/career-advice/military-transition/famous-veteran-charles-durning.html ⁠
⁠
#honor365 #honorvet365 #rememberingtheone #veteran #army #wwii #purpleheart #silverstar #bronzestar

"I was the second man off my barge, and the first and third man got killed."⁠

Born in Highland Falls, New York, Charles Durning was the ninth of ten children. Five of his siblings died due to scarlet fever and smallpox, and much of his early life was spent in hardship. Although he displayed a passion for entertaining others, a high school teacher told him that he was talentless in art, language, and math and was better suited to working in an office. He was undeterred, however, and would become one of the greatest character actors in living memory.⁠

Durning was drafted into the U.S. Army just in time to fight in World War II. He was part of the landing forces at Normandy during the initial invasion of France by Allied forces. Although he survived the initial assault relatively unscathed, he was wounded by a German mine a few days later and earned a Purple Heart. After recovering for six months, he was put back on the front lines to combat the German Ardennes offensive.⁠

During the German attack, Durning reported that a particularly young soldier charged him, but Durning couldn’t bring himself to fire. The two fought with their bayonets, and Durning suffered further injury during the fight. Durning killed the German infantryman which became a particularly painful memory. After the offensive, Durning received his second Purple Heart.⁠

Before the war was over, Durning received a third Purple Heart and the Silver and Bronze Stars for valor. The chest wound which earned him the Purple Heart prompted his evacuation to the United States for recovery where he spent the remainder of his time with the Army. He was discharged in 1946 as a private first class.⁠

We honor you, Charles Durning.⁠

#Repost @https://www.military.com/veteran-jobs/career-advice/military-transition/famous-veteran-charles-durning.html ⁠

#honor365 #honorvet365 #rememberingtheone #veteran #army #wwii #purpleheart #silverstar #bronzestar
...

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Pettit was last seen on Sept. 11 near Tower Two, snagging scenes of the terrorist attacks for future training films and searching for an operations command center, Kroupa said. Capt. Sean Crowley and Officer Edward Aswad of the New York Police Department, who saw Pettit after the terrorist attacks began, told Kroupa that her brother "wasn't fearful and was calm." Pettit's body was recovered near the rubble of the South tower on December. 15.⁠
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Glen Pettit was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor during the Annual Medal Day ceremony on December 4, 2001. The New York City Police Department Medal of Honor is the highest award that may be bestowed upon a member of the service. ⁠
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We honor you, Glen Pettit.⁠
⁠
#Repost @https://www.nypdangels.com/cop/cop.php?id=8⁠
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#honor365 #rememberingtheone #LEO #kia #fallenhero #911⁠

Pettit was last seen on Sept. 11 near Tower Two, snagging scenes of the terrorist attacks for future training films and searching for an operations command center, Kroupa said. Capt. Sean Crowley and Officer Edward Aswad of the New York Police Department, who saw Pettit after the terrorist attacks began, told Kroupa that her brother "wasn't fearful and was calm." Pettit's body was recovered near the rubble of the South tower on December. 15.⁠

Glen Pettit was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor during the Annual Medal Day ceremony on December 4, 2001. The New York City Police Department Medal of Honor is the highest award that may be bestowed upon a member of the service. ⁠

We honor you, Glen Pettit.⁠

#Repost @https://www.nypdangels.com/cop/cop.php?id=8⁠

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #LEO #kia #fallenhero #911⁠
...

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We honor you, Colin Powell 🇺🇸

We honor you, Colin Powell 🇺🇸 ...

4 0
For as long as I have known Faye‚ she always felt she was put here on earth to help people. From helping with the school PTA‚ serving her community as a firefighter‚ or just lending an ear to someone who needed a friend‚ she was always willing to help.⁠
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Faye came on board with the Bon Secour Fire / Rescue (Alabama) a year and a half after I did in August of 1999. She didn’t understand why I found it so gratifying until she went to her 1st brush fire. To be that person in need’s saving grace‚ the one they relied on‚ gave her a sense of importance and meaning to our tiny community. She lived and breathed firefighting. Her love for the fire service reached out to the internet as she maintained the department’s website. She also started an online community for volunteer Firefighters around the world to share information‚ stories‚ and ideas.⁠
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To this day‚ the club has over 600 members in 6 continents. To the internet‚ she was known firefighting_lady or ladyfire. To our community‚ she is known as Edna Faye Bishop.⁠
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Faye answered her final call April 7th‚ 2002. In years prior‚ we both had discussed a few times‚ if we could choose how we went‚ we wanted to go while firefighting. That unfortunate day came last year and while I wrestled with God and his decision to take this wife & mother of 2 in the prime of her life‚ I then realized‚ Faye went out the best way anyone could‚ a hero. A hero that died doing something to make a difference in all of our lives.⁠
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We honor you, Edna Faye Bishop.⁠
⁠
Submitted by her husband. #Repost @https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/edna-faye-bishop/⁠
⁠
#honor365 #honorvet365 #rememberingtheone #firstresponder #firefighter #KIA #fallenhero

For as long as I have known Faye‚ she always felt she was put here on earth to help people. From helping with the school PTA‚ serving her community as a firefighter‚ or just lending an ear to someone who needed a friend‚ she was always willing to help.⁠

Faye came on board with the Bon Secour Fire / Rescue (Alabama) a year and a half after I did in August of 1999. She didn’t understand why I found it so gratifying until she went to her 1st brush fire. To be that person in need’s saving grace‚ the one they relied on‚ gave her a sense of importance and meaning to our tiny community. She lived and breathed firefighting. Her love for the fire service reached out to the internet as she maintained the department’s website. She also started an online community for volunteer Firefighters around the world to share information‚ stories‚ and ideas.⁠

To this day‚ the club has over 600 members in 6 continents. To the internet‚ she was known firefighting_lady or ladyfire. To our community‚ she is known as Edna Faye Bishop.⁠

Faye answered her final call April 7th‚ 2002. In years prior‚ we both had discussed a few times‚ if we could choose how we went‚ we wanted to go while firefighting. That unfortunate day came last year and while I wrestled with God and his decision to take this wife & mother of 2 in the prime of her life‚ I then realized‚ Faye went out the best way anyone could‚ a hero. A hero that died doing something to make a difference in all of our lives.⁠

We honor you, Edna Faye Bishop.⁠

Submitted by her husband. #Repost @https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/edna-faye-bishop/⁠

#honor365 #honorvet365 #rememberingtheone #firstresponder #firefighter #KIA #fallenhero
...

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Idawalley Zorada Lewis(-Wilson)⁠
⁠
Ida Lewis is one of the most famous personages to have ever served in the Coast Guard or in the case, the U.S. Lighthouse Service, one of the Coast Guard's predecessors. She gained national notoriety during a time when most women in the United States were not in the professional workforce nor on the national stage.  She overcame the biases of the time, through skill and professional ability, to become the official keeper of the Lime Rock Light Station, a position she held until her death.⁠
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She met a president, Ulysses S. Grant, a Vice-President, Schuyler Colfax, made the cover of Harper's Weekly, a national publication, in 1869, was featured in stories in Putnam's Magazine and The New York Tribune, and received accolades and awards from around the country.  Surprisingly, most of the attention was not due to her first-rate skills and abilities as a lightkeeper but rather for her abilities as a life-saver.  In fact, she was known as "The Bravest Woman in America," a title bestowed upon her by the Society of the American Cross of Honor.  Light keepers were frequently asked to risk their lives to saved the shipwrecked or others in danger of drowning and Ida Lewis did just that countless times and received the nation's highest award for lifesaving.  She was an expert small boat handler and was quite skilled with oars.  Indeed, she could "row a boat faster than any man in Newport [RI]."⁠
⁠
She was officially credited with saving 18 lives during her 39 years at Lime Rock and was awarded the Gold Lifesaving Medal.⁠
⁠
We honor you, Ida Lewis.⁠
⁠
#Repost @https://www.history.uscg.mil/Browse-by-Topic/Notable-People/All/Article/1862507/idawalley-zorada-lewis-wilson-keeper-uslhs/ ⁠
⁠
#honor365 #honorvet365 #rememberingtheone #veteran #coastguard #goldlifesavingmedal #breakingbarriers

Idawalley Zorada Lewis(-Wilson)⁠

Ida Lewis is one of the most famous personages to have ever served in the Coast Guard or in the case, the U.S. Lighthouse Service, one of the Coast Guard's predecessors. She gained national notoriety during a time when most women in the United States were not in the professional workforce nor on the national stage. She overcame the biases of the time, through skill and professional ability, to become the official keeper of the Lime Rock Light Station, a position she held until her death.⁠

She met a president, Ulysses S. Grant, a Vice-President, Schuyler Colfax, made the cover of Harper's Weekly, a national publication, in 1869, was featured in stories in Putnam's Magazine and The New York Tribune, and received accolades and awards from around the country. Surprisingly, most of the attention was not due to her first-rate skills and abilities as a lightkeeper but rather for her abilities as a life-saver. In fact, she was known as "The Bravest Woman in America," a title bestowed upon her by the Society of the American Cross of Honor. Light keepers were frequently asked to risk their lives to saved the shipwrecked or others in danger of drowning and Ida Lewis did just that countless times and received the nation's highest award for lifesaving. She was an expert small boat handler and was quite skilled with oars. Indeed, she could "row a boat faster than any man in Newport [RI]."⁠

She was officially credited with saving 18 lives during her 39 years at Lime Rock and was awarded the Gold Lifesaving Medal.⁠

We honor you, Ida Lewis.⁠

#Repost @https://www.history.uscg.mil/Browse-by-Topic/Notable-People/All/Article/1862507/idawalley-zorada-lewis-wilson-keeper-uslhs/ ⁠

#honor365 #honorvet365 #rememberingtheone #veteran #coastguard #goldlifesavingmedal #breakingbarriers
...

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