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our mission & vision

Our Mission:  To provide resource and referral services for veterans, first responders, and their families.
Our Vision:  A world without suicide.
Our Pillars:  Education, Employment, Healthcare, Housing
Proceeds support mental wellness for veterans, first responders, and their families.

WHAT WE DO

EDUCATION

Honor365 is partnered with education institutions and existing programs to help veterans and first responders reach their education goals.

EMPLOYMENT

Honor365 is providing resource and referral services for veterans and first responders for gainful employment.

HEALTHCARE

Honor365 is partnered with private industry and public institutions to provide free services in outpatient therapy for veterans, first responders, and their families.

HOUSING

Honor365 is partnered with companies to help veterans and first responders find affordable housing while improving the needs of their home.

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Percentage of veterans who were unemployed in November 2020.

%

The percentage of full-time student veterans who dropped out of college enrollment in 2017.

%

In 2019, there was a 2.1% decrease in the estimated number of homeless veterans nationwide. 793 veterans now have shelter.

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During a 20-year period, the total suicide rate in the United States increased 35% from 10.5% per 100,000 in 1999 to 14.2% per 100,000 per 100,000 in 2018.

“Jeff was a force of nature. He was fearless, br “Jeff was a force of nature. He was fearless, brave and determined so when he put his mind to doing something, he would get it done,” says Retired New York Police Detective and United States Coast Guard Reservist Chris Cassano, discussing Firefighter Jeffrey Palazzo. 

Following eight years of Coast Guard active duty, MK1 Palazzo joined FDNY Rescue 5 on Staten Island while continuing his service in the Reserve. On September 11th, 2001, Palazzo was one of the hundreds of FDNY members that made the ultimate sacrifice trying to save others. 

Saving lives was what drew Palazzo to the Coast Guard in the first place. According to Irene, Jeff’s first rescue occurred when he was the tender age of eight. He helped some boaters who had capsized while sailing. 

Palazzo served with distinction in the Coast Guard as a Machinery Technician 1st Class on the Cutter CAPE HORN at Station Rockaway. He was part of the crew that decommissioned the cutter in 1990 and then carried on his service at Rockaway. 

MK1 Palazzo responded to many high-profile incidents and large-scale emergencies, including the sinking of the Bronx Queen, a charter boat off the Rockaways in rough seas during the winter of 1989. Seventeen passengers from the sinking ship were successfully saved from the frigid waters. 

Palazzo served much of his time in Rockaway under CWO4 Bruce Schneider, who describes him as “a very ambitious and smart individual. [He] was focused on rescue through and through.” So it came as no surprise to Bruce when his former report decided to change careers to become a New York City firefighter in 1996. 

He spent his first five years with FDNY at Ladder Company 109 in Brooklyn. In the spring of 2010, Palazzo joined Staten Island's elite Rescue 5 squad in Concord. 

We honor you, Jeffrey Palazzo.

Excerpts #Repost @https://www.coastguardmuseum.org/palazzo 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11

“Jeff was a force of nature. He was fearless, brave and determined so when he put his mind to doing something, he would get it done,” says Retired New York Police Detective and United States Coast Guard Reservist Chris Cassano, discussing Firefighter Jeffrey Palazzo.

Following eight years of Coast Guard active duty, MK1 Palazzo joined FDNY Rescue 5 on Staten Island while continuing his service in the Reserve. On September 11th, 2001, Palazzo was one of the hundreds of FDNY members that made the ultimate sacrifice trying to save others.

Saving lives was what drew Palazzo to the Coast Guard in the first place. According to Irene, Jeff’s first rescue occurred when he was the tender age of eight. He helped some boaters who had capsized while sailing.

Palazzo served with distinction in the Coast Guard as a Machinery Technician 1st Class on the Cutter CAPE HORN at Station Rockaway. He was part of the crew that decommissioned the cutter in 1990 and then carried on his service at Rockaway.

MK1 Palazzo responded to many high-profile incidents and large-scale emergencies, including the sinking of the Bronx Queen, a charter boat off the Rockaways in rough seas during the winter of 1989. Seventeen passengers from the sinking ship were successfully saved from the frigid waters.

Palazzo served much of his time in Rockaway under CWO4 Bruce Schneider, who describes him as “a very ambitious and smart individual. [He] was focused on rescue through and through.” So it came as no surprise to Bruce when his former report decided to change careers to become a New York City firefighter in 1996.

He spent his first five years with FDNY at Ladder Company 109 in Brooklyn. In the spring of 2010, Palazzo joined Staten Island's elite Rescue 5 squad in Concord.

We honor you, Jeffrey Palazzo.

Excerpts #Repost @https://www.coastguardmuseum.org/palazzo

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11
...

R ichard Bruce Van Hine, known to all as Bruce, ha R ichard Bruce Van Hine, known to all as Bruce, had been a firefighter for 12 years, most recently with Squad 41 in the South Bronx. The father of Meghan, 14, and Emily, 17, he was one of six men lost from the squad on Sept. 11.

Firefighter Van Hine, 48, had always wanted to be a firefighter, said Ann, his wife of 21 years.

"He was on the list to be a firefighter for seven years," she said. "I am a firm believer in following your dreams, so I encouraged him." But Firefighter Van Hine also loved the outdoors. Even though he took only day hikes, he had completed the New Jersey, New York and Connecticut legs of the Appalachian Trail.

A prized memory, Mrs. Van Hine said, was of a five-week camping trip the family took four years ago that included the Badlands of South Dakota, the Grand Tetons, Yellowstone National Park and the Rocky Mountains. 

We honor you, Richard Bruce Van Hine.

#Repost @http://www.heroportraits.org/Gallery/default.aspx?id=128 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11

R ichard Bruce Van Hine, known to all as Bruce, had been a firefighter for 12 years, most recently with Squad 41 in the South Bronx. The father of Meghan, 14, and Emily, 17, he was one of six men lost from the squad on Sept. 11.

Firefighter Van Hine, 48, had always wanted to be a firefighter, said Ann, his wife of 21 years.

"He was on the list to be a firefighter for seven years," she said. "I am a firm believer in following your dreams, so I encouraged him." But Firefighter Van Hine also loved the outdoors. Even though he took only day hikes, he had completed the New Jersey, New York and Connecticut legs of the Appalachian Trail.

A prized memory, Mrs. Van Hine said, was of a five-week camping trip the family took four years ago that included the Badlands of South Dakota, the Grand Tetons, Yellowstone National Park and the Rocky Mountains.

We honor you, Richard Bruce Van Hine.

#Repost @http://www.heroportraits.org/Gallery/default.aspx?id=128

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11
...

It is with deep regret to announce the passing of It is with deep regret to announce the passing of FF Dennis A Farrell of Ladder Company 59, who lost his battle with WTC illness on Tuesday February 23, 2021. FF Farrell served the New York City Fire Department (FDNY) for 11 years.

We honor you, Dennis Farrell.

#Repost @https://www.facebook.com/911Bravest/photos/a.508157775927923/3720939431316392/ 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #9-11 #fallenhero #post9-11illness

It is with deep regret to announce the passing of FF Dennis A Farrell of Ladder Company 59, who lost his battle with WTC illness on Tuesday February 23, 2021. FF Farrell served the New York City Fire Department (FDNY) for 11 years.

We honor you, Dennis Farrell.

#Repost @https://www.facebook.com/911Bravest/photos/a.508157775927923/3720939431316392/

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #9-11 #fallenhero #post9-11illness
...

Lt. Robert F. Wallace Bob was born in New York bu Lt. Robert F. Wallace

Bob was born in New York but acted like a tourist. He was always looking up and pointing to the sky; that was his trademark.

It was just like Bob to be there when someone was in need. Friends‚ relatives and neighbors still comment on how he helped them through rough and troubled times.

Bob was unique; his sense of humor‚ his attitude for all his fellow man was second to none. He was a dedicated husband‚ proud father‚ devoted son‚ counselor‚ humorist and the best damn firefighter you could ever meet. He came from a family of firefighters.

Bob will never be forgotten‚ for we will hold that picture of Bob pointing to the sky and saying ‘I’ll see you in heaven some day. I’ll be the one with the wings on backwards.’ All his family and close friends will know what that means.

– Mary Wallace 

We honor you, Robert Wallace.

#Repost @https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/robert-f-wallace/ 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11

Lt. Robert F. Wallace

Bob was born in New York but acted like a tourist. He was always looking up and pointing to the sky; that was his trademark.

It was just like Bob to be there when someone was in need. Friends‚ relatives and neighbors still comment on how he helped them through rough and troubled times.

Bob was unique; his sense of humor‚ his attitude for all his fellow man was second to none. He was a dedicated husband‚ proud father‚ devoted son‚ counselor‚ humorist and the best damn firefighter you could ever meet. He came from a family of firefighters.

Bob will never be forgotten‚ for we will hold that picture of Bob pointing to the sky and saying ‘I’ll see you in heaven some day. I’ll be the one with the wings on backwards.’ All his family and close friends will know what that means.

– Mary Wallace

We honor you, Robert Wallace.

#Repost @https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/robert-f-wallace/

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11
...

Twenty years ago, Stephen Neil Hyland, Jr., told a Twenty years ago, Stephen Neil Hyland, Jr., told a friend what he’d like his epitaph to read: “Born with the gift of laughter and a sense that the world was mad.” It was just too fitting, said those who love him most. 

“You look back, and all you think about is him laughing,” his father, Stephen, said. “When he was in a room, everybody gathered around him.” He made everyone laugh, but never told a joke. 

Hyland, 45, who went by his middle name, was a lieutenant colonel in the Army and worked at the Pentagon on personnel issues. October would have marked his 21st anniversary in the military, but he has been officially declared missing since September 11. 

Weekends, Tobin said, were party times for Hyland, when friends would gather for barbecues and laughs. During the week, however, Hyland took his job seriously. “He was so elated to work at the Pentagon,” his father said. 

Hyland moved from place to place as a child, but the family eventually landed in Southern California, where he went to Damien High School. His father, two sisters, and a brother still live in that area, and another sister lives in New Jersey. He graduated with a degree in English literature from the University of Notre Dame, of which he was proud. 

“He always had a great love of life,” friend Ruth Tobin said. “He also had a great love of history. The fact that he is part of history is going to give us comfort; not now, but I think in years to come.” 

Recalling his laughter and dedication to country, his sister, Cheryl Hyland, put it simply: “I’m proud that Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Neil Hyland is my brother.” 

We honor you, Stephen Neil Hyland Jr.

#Repost @https://pentagonmemorial.org/explore/biographies/ltc-stephen-n-hyland-jr-usa 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #veteran #army #kia #fallenhero #9-11

Twenty years ago, Stephen Neil Hyland, Jr., told a friend what he’d like his epitaph to read: “Born with the gift of laughter and a sense that the world was mad.” It was just too fitting, said those who love him most.

“You look back, and all you think about is him laughing,” his father, Stephen, said. “When he was in a room, everybody gathered around him.” He made everyone laugh, but never told a joke.

Hyland, 45, who went by his middle name, was a lieutenant colonel in the Army and worked at the Pentagon on personnel issues. October would have marked his 21st anniversary in the military, but he has been officially declared missing since September 11.

Weekends, Tobin said, were party times for Hyland, when friends would gather for barbecues and laughs. During the week, however, Hyland took his job seriously. “He was so elated to work at the Pentagon,” his father said.

Hyland moved from place to place as a child, but the family eventually landed in Southern California, where he went to Damien High School. His father, two sisters, and a brother still live in that area, and another sister lives in New Jersey. He graduated with a degree in English literature from the University of Notre Dame, of which he was proud.

“He always had a great love of life,” friend Ruth Tobin said. “He also had a great love of history. The fact that he is part of history is going to give us comfort; not now, but I think in years to come.”

Recalling his laughter and dedication to country, his sister, Cheryl Hyland, put it simply: “I’m proud that Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Neil Hyland is my brother.”

We honor you, Stephen Neil Hyland Jr.

#Repost @https://pentagonmemorial.org/explore/biographies/ltc-stephen-n-hyland-jr-usa

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #veteran #army #kia #fallenhero #9-11
...

Jan 7, 2021 This is the 9/11 story of the Estreic Jan 7, 2021

This is the 9/11 story of the Estreicher family: Maryann and her daughters, Callie & Tori. Maryann’s husband, Richard, was an FDNY Lieutenant, studying to be promoted to Captain and was supposed to be in a class that morning steps from Rescue 5 on Staten Island, where he had worked for 10 years. He was too exhausted to go to class, having worked a 24-hour shift the day before. Maryann, who used to work steps from The World Trade Center in the ’90s, was home alone, watching “Good Morning America”, when she saw the first reports of a plane hitting The World Trade Center. 

Minutes after the towers were hit in the first suicide-by-passenger-jet-ever strikes, Richie, who served with the Marines for three years, was on the phone to Maryann, telling her the country was under attack, directing her to bring home the girls from school. He also advised his wife to gas up the car and get cash from the ATM. He told Maryann “I love you and I don’t know if I’m coming back”. Most of the day, Maryann was on the phone, trying to find out if Richie was still alive. No one answered any of her calls. 

It wasn’t until midnight when Richie finally called, telling her, “They’re all gone”. Richie Estreicher lost 11 firefighters from Rescue 5 on September 11th, along with countless FDNY buddies.  For 8 months after, like thousands of others, Richie worked on “the pile”, the burning debris of The World Trade Center, breathing in poisonous fumes.  More than 18 years after surviving 9/11, on November 11, 2019, Veterans Day 2019, FDNY Lt. Richard Estreicher died of 9/11 cancer, 2 days shy of his 60th birthday.

We honor you, Richard Estreicher.

#Repost @https://q1043.iheart.com/content/2021-01-07-the-estreicher-family/  Photo @https://herestothekidswhogrewupwithafirstresponderparenton911.com/heres-to-the-kids 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11

Jan 7, 2021

This is the 9/11 story of the Estreicher family: Maryann and her daughters, Callie & Tori. Maryann’s husband, Richard, was an FDNY Lieutenant, studying to be promoted to Captain and was supposed to be in a class that morning steps from Rescue 5 on Staten Island, where he had worked for 10 years. He was too exhausted to go to class, having worked a 24-hour shift the day before. Maryann, who used to work steps from The World Trade Center in the ’90s, was home alone, watching “Good Morning America”, when she saw the first reports of a plane hitting The World Trade Center.

Minutes after the towers were hit in the first suicide-by-passenger-jet-ever strikes, Richie, who served with the Marines for three years, was on the phone to Maryann, telling her the country was under attack, directing her to bring home the girls from school. He also advised his wife to gas up the car and get cash from the ATM. He told Maryann “I love you and I don’t know if I’m coming back”. Most of the day, Maryann was on the phone, trying to find out if Richie was still alive. No one answered any of her calls.

It wasn’t until midnight when Richie finally called, telling her, “They’re all gone”. Richie Estreicher lost 11 firefighters from Rescue 5 on September 11th, along with countless FDNY buddies. For 8 months after, like thousands of others, Richie worked on “the pile”, the burning debris of The World Trade Center, breathing in poisonous fumes. More than 18 years after surviving 9/11, on November 11, 2019, Veterans Day 2019, FDNY Lt. Richard Estreicher died of 9/11 cancer, 2 days shy of his 60th birthday.

We honor you, Richard Estreicher.

#Repost @https://q1043.iheart.com/content/2021-01-07-the-estreicher-family/ Photo @https://herestothekidswhogrewupwithafirstresponderparenton911.com/heres-to-the-kids

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11
...

Edward J. Rall, 44, of Holbrook, was a New York Ci Edward J. Rall, 44, of Holbrook, was a New York City firefighter with Rescue Company 2 in Crown Heights, Brooklyn. He was among seven firefighters from Rescue 2 who perished on Sept. 11, 2001. The men were believed to be in the north tower. His remains were never found.

When the first hijacked plane crashed into the north tower on Sept. 11, 2001, Darlene Rall knew that Eddie would be at the World Trade Center, but she wasn’t concerned that death would touch her husband. Minutes later, another plane struck the south tower and she was still at work going about her business.

“I have to say I wasn’t nervous. It was a big chance for a rescue for him, doing what he wanted as a fireman,” said Darlene, 52, of Holbrook. “As strange as it might be I was excited for him.” It wasn’t until Darlene heard that a third and fourth plane had crashed into the Pentagon and into a Pennsylvania field that she became concerned. “The minute I walked in the door, I saw the first tower come down. I knew more than likely he wasn’t coming home,” she said.

Eddie coached baseball when his son, Daniel, was a kid. The Sachem Youth Advisory Group, part of the school district league, held a memorial baseball tournament in Eddie’s honor. In the first year, about 30 teams from the tri-state area participated in the weekend-long tournament, Darlene said. Now, there are 159 teams. The money goes to help the league pay for the upkeep and maintenance of the baseball fields and to fund the Edward Rall Memorial Scholarship.

We honor you, Edward Rall.

#Repost @https://wodwell.com/wod/edward-rall/ 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11

Edward J. Rall, 44, of Holbrook, was a New York City firefighter with Rescue Company 2 in Crown Heights, Brooklyn. He was among seven firefighters from Rescue 2 who perished on Sept. 11, 2001. The men were believed to be in the north tower. His remains were never found.

When the first hijacked plane crashed into the north tower on Sept. 11, 2001, Darlene Rall knew that Eddie would be at the World Trade Center, but she wasn’t concerned that death would touch her husband. Minutes later, another plane struck the south tower and she was still at work going about her business.

“I have to say I wasn’t nervous. It was a big chance for a rescue for him, doing what he wanted as a fireman,” said Darlene, 52, of Holbrook. “As strange as it might be I was excited for him.” It wasn’t until Darlene heard that a third and fourth plane had crashed into the Pentagon and into a Pennsylvania field that she became concerned. “The minute I walked in the door, I saw the first tower come down. I knew more than likely he wasn’t coming home,” she said.

Eddie coached baseball when his son, Daniel, was a kid. The Sachem Youth Advisory Group, part of the school district league, held a memorial baseball tournament in Eddie’s honor. In the first year, about 30 teams from the tri-state area participated in the weekend-long tournament, Darlene said. Now, there are 159 teams. The money goes to help the league pay for the upkeep and maintenance of the baseball fields and to fund the Edward Rall Memorial Scholarship.

We honor you, Edward Rall.

#Repost @https://wodwell.com/wod/edward-rall/

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11
...

Lt. Peter C. Martin had plenty of interests. He li Lt. Peter C. Martin had plenty of interests. He liked to watch Nascar races, "glued to the TV," said his friend, Lt. Peter Lund. He also kept track of how many fires he had been to, perhaps inspired by a book, "20,000 Alarms," that was lying around the Rescue 2 firehouse in Brooklyn. 

And once a month, he would take out the antique rifles he collected, put on a cowboy hat and take aim at the buffalo silhouettes set up on a field in the Hamptons with other members of the local Single Action Shooting Society. There he was known as "Sidewinder Pete," a true aficionado to whom the group dedicated a memorial shoot last month. 

But mostly, Mr. Martin, 43, cared about being a father to his three boys, ages 13, 9 and 6. His own father had died when he was 11 months old. "As much as he loved the Fire Department, his first love was ours," said his wife, Alice. "He would race home from work so he could put the boys to bed. He'd sing to them, and tell them stories. He had a whole routine." 

Now Mrs. Martin is taking care of things on her own. "I get a lot of strength from Peter," she said. "I can almost hear him saying to me, 'Everything's O.K.' " 

We honor you, Peter Martin.

#Repost @http://bravestmemorial.net/html/members/martin_peter_lt_r002.html  Photo @http://bravestmemorial.net/html/members_individual/martin_peter/martin_newsday_article.html 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11

Lt. Peter C. Martin had plenty of interests. He liked to watch Nascar races, "glued to the TV," said his friend, Lt. Peter Lund. He also kept track of how many fires he had been to, perhaps inspired by a book, "20,000 Alarms," that was lying around the Rescue 2 firehouse in Brooklyn.

And once a month, he would take out the antique rifles he collected, put on a cowboy hat and take aim at the buffalo silhouettes set up on a field in the Hamptons with other members of the local Single Action Shooting Society. There he was known as "Sidewinder Pete," a true aficionado to whom the group dedicated a memorial shoot last month.

But mostly, Mr. Martin, 43, cared about being a father to his three boys, ages 13, 9 and 6. His own father had died when he was 11 months old. "As much as he loved the Fire Department, his first love was ours," said his wife, Alice. "He would race home from work so he could put the boys to bed. He'd sing to them, and tell them stories. He had a whole routine."

Now Mrs. Martin is taking care of things on her own. "I get a lot of strength from Peter," she said. "I can almost hear him saying to me, 'Everything's O.K.' "

We honor you, Peter Martin.

#Repost @http://bravestmemorial.net/html/members/martin_peter_lt_r002.html Photo @http://bravestmemorial.net/html/members_individual/martin_peter/martin_newsday_article.html

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11
...

Terrence P. Farrell lived close to the flame, said Terrence P. Farrell lived close to the flame, said his brother Dennis. As a transit police officer, Terrence Farrell's specialty had been disasters. In the Fire Department, he joined Rescue Company 4, an elite unit specially trained to do things like extricate people from collapsed buildings.

Mr. Farrell, who was 45, was not simply a New York City firefighter. He was also a volunteer fireman near his home in Huntington, N.Y., a part-time construction contractor and a father of two. And, a few years back, he helped save the life of a child in Nevada by donating his bone marrow.

Here is that story. When Mr. Farrell joined the department, his blood had been tested as part of a program to screen for potential bone marrow donors, Dennis Farrell said. Told years later that his blood matched that of a small girl dying of t-cell lymphoma, he underwent the painful process of marrow extraction.

A year later, he learned that the child was considered cured. She and her family flew to New York and had lunch with him at the World Trade Center, his brother said.

On Nov. 1, they were back. Fellow firefighters had raised $3,000 to fly them to New York for Mr. Farrell's funeral because they did not have the money. 

We honor you, Terrence Farrell.

#Repost @http://www.legacy.com/Sept11/Story.aspx?PersonID=132227  Photo @https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/5867895/terrence-patrick-farrell 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11

Terrence P. Farrell lived close to the flame, said his brother Dennis. As a transit police officer, Terrence Farrell's specialty had been disasters. In the Fire Department, he joined Rescue Company 4, an elite unit specially trained to do things like extricate people from collapsed buildings.

Mr. Farrell, who was 45, was not simply a New York City firefighter. He was also a volunteer fireman near his home in Huntington, N.Y., a part-time construction contractor and a father of two. And, a few years back, he helped save the life of a child in Nevada by donating his bone marrow.

Here is that story. When Mr. Farrell joined the department, his blood had been tested as part of a program to screen for potential bone marrow donors, Dennis Farrell said. Told years later that his blood matched that of a small girl dying of t-cell lymphoma, he underwent the painful process of marrow extraction.

A year later, he learned that the child was considered cured. She and her family flew to New York and had lunch with him at the World Trade Center, his brother said.

On Nov. 1, they were back. Fellow firefighters had raised $3,000 to fly them to New York for Mr. Farrell's funeral because they did not have the money.

We honor you, Terrence Farrell.

#Repost @http://www.legacy.com/Sept11/Story.aspx?PersonID=132227 Photo @https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/5867895/terrence-patrick-farrell

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11
...

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