LTC Regina H. Schiffman

2017-10-20 Schiffman

Regina graduated from West Philadelphia High School and entered nurses training at the Hahneman Hospital School Of Nursing. Upon graduation, she began as an operating room nurse at the Presbyterian Medical Center in NYC. After three years of Neurosurgical Nursing work there she decided to make a career in the U.S.Army. A year after she enlisted, the U.S. was at war in Korea, & in the summer of 1951 she found herself working in the operating room of the 8063rd. M.A.S.H unit in Korea. Conditions were primitive in both the Operating Room (tent), as well as in her tent for living. A pot-bellied stove for heat, & her helmet for bathing, but she grew strength from the selflessness of her mission & the camaraderie of her fellow nurses, physicians & soldiers.

Before retiring after 21 years of service she served at Brooke Army Medical Center BAMC), Fort Sam Houston, Texas, Letterman General Hospital, San Francisco, Valley Forge General Hospital, Pennsylvania, 8063rd. Mobile Army Surgical Hospital (MASH), Korea, Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland, Walter Reed Medical Center, Washington, D.C., Landstuhl & Frankfort Germany, Japan, & Ft. Benning, Georgia. During her career she was awarded The Korean Service Medal, United nations Service medal, National Defense Service Medal W/1 oak leaf cluster, & The Meritorious Service Medal. While serving in the Army, she also completed her Master’s Degree in Nursing at Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas, & graduated Magna Cum Laude. She retired in San Antonio, Texas where she lived in Windcrest, & finally at the Army Residence Community. During her retirement she traveled all around the world on 56 ocean cruises.

We honor you, Regina Schiffman.

(#Repost @Dignity Memorial)

Capt Warren H. Berg

2017-10-19 Berg

In 1941, Warren graduated from Mankato State Teachers’ College (now Minnesota State University-Mankato) with a bachelor’s degree in education, intending to become a college professor. He completed a year of graduate work at the University of Minnesota, but World War II then dramatically altered his career plans. He enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps (now U.S. Air Force) and was called to active duty in November 1942. Warren graduated at the top of his Navigator Training School class at Mather Field in Sacramento, CA, in 1943 and was assigned to the Eighth Air Force, 96th Bomb Group, at Snetterton Heath, England. After 30 bombing missions over Europe, the crew of his B-17, The Reluctant Dragon, developed a reputation for being lucky. The 11 other crews that had reported for combat duty at the same time had been shot down. Warren and his crewmates signed up for a second tour, eventually leading as many as 1,000 B-17s and B-24s to German targets. But their luck ran out on mission No. 36 on Jan. 13, 1945. They were shot down over Bischofsheim, Germany. Six of 10 crew members bailed out at 24,000 feet and survived, but they were taken prisoner. On April 29, 1945, Gen. George Patton and his Third Army liberated Stalag 7A near Moosburg, and soon 1st Lieutenant Berg was headed home. He was promoted to Captain and awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal with six Oak-Leaf Clusters. The experiences of his B-17 crew are among those recounted in the book ‘D-Day Bombers: The Veterans’ Story’ by Stephen Darlow.

Later that year, Warren began a 38- year career with Trans World Airlines in Kansas City when he was hired as a navigation instructor. He and Genevieve, who he had known since high school, married on April 27, 1946, and spent almost all their married life in Kansas City, North. Warren retired in 1983 as Director of Flight Operations Ground Training for all TWA pilots and flight engineers. He also had supervised the safety training of flight attendants. His various administrative positions over the years necessitated considerable world travel. He served on the training committee of the International Air Transport Association, wrote numerous training manuals used in the airline industry and audited training procedures for Ethiopian and Saudi Arabian airlines. Upon his retirement, he was honored as a leader in airline training by the Boeing Aircraft Flight Crew Training Center and Delta, American and United Airlines.

We honor you, Warren Berg.

(#Repost @Together We Served)

SN James Lawrence Blaskis

2017-10-18 Blaskis

James Blaskis was one of the 134 men killed in the 1967 USS Forrestal fire. It was a devastating fire and series of chain-reaction explosions on 29 July 1967, that not only killed 134 sailors, but injured 161 on the aircraft carrier USS Forrestal (CVA-59), after an electrical anomaly discharged a Zuni rocket on the flight deck. Forrestal was engaged in combat operations in the Gulf of Tonkin during the Vietnam War at the time.

Blaskis was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Medal (Posthumously) for his heroism that day. Seaman Blaskis was manning the port steering area in the extreme port quarter of the ship when fire broke out on the flight deck causing several explosions. One of the initial explosions hurled shrapnel into the port compartment, killing one man and seriously wounding Seaman Blaskis and his other shipmate. Despite his wounds, he administered first aid to his companion until he succumbed to his own wounds.

We honor you James Blaskis.

(#Repost @Together We Served)

SSG Joseph A. Chinick

2017-10-17 Chinick

SSG Joseph A. Chinick died July 13, 1944 in Europe. Joe received the Bronze Star posthumously with no explanation as his effort had been classified as “Secret.” To date, his brother Harold has not been able to learn the reason for the Bronze Star Award.

We honor you, Joseph Chinick.

(#Repost @Pritzker Military Museum and Library)

Cpl Ralph Racacho

2017-10-15 Racacho

Racacho served with  D Company, 1st Battalion, 1st Marines, 1st Marine Division. Corporal Racacho was wounded on 24 August 1968 while he was leaving the helicopter he was on and was hit in the right arm by a gunshot. Later he received more wounds to his neck and head from shrapnel.

We honor you, Ralph Racacho.

(#Repost @National Purple Heart Hall of Valor)

ADM Edwin John Roland

2017-10-15 Roland

Edwin John Roland was born on 11 February 19O5, at Buffalo, NY. where he graduated from Canisius High School and attended Canisius College. Appointed a Cadet in 1926, he graduated from the U. S. Coast Guard Academy, New London, CT with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Engineering and with a commission of Ensign on 15 May 1929.

He served his earliest assignments as Gunnery Officer on board the destroyers USCGC SHAW (1929-30), and the USCGC WILKES (1930-31), which were part of the old Destroyer Force operated by the Coast Guard between l924 and 1934 in an all-out attempt to suppress smuggling. He won a commendation for being instrumental in capturing the gunnery trophy for both vessels.

In 1932 he was in charge of target observation and repair for the Destroyer Force Target Practice in the Gulf of Mexico and for Cutter Target Practice off Norfolk, VA. In September he was assigned as Navigator and Gunnery Officer on board the USCGC ESCANABA, based at Grand Haven, MI. Detached in l934, he spent the next four years at the Coast Guard Academy as an Instructor in Physics and Mathematics and an Assistant Coach for football, basketball, and baseball. During the summer cadet practice cruise of 1936 on board the USCGC CAYUGA, he participated in the evacuation of Spanish Civil War refugees.

During World War II he served as Chief, Enlisted Personnel Division at Coast Guard Headquarters, Washington, DC from May 1942 to October 1943. He next served as Commander, Escort Division a unit of Task Force 60, which escorted convoys from the United States to Mediterranean ports. His, flagship was the Coast Guard-manned destroyer escort, USS VANCE (DE-387). For meritorious performance of that duty he was awarded the Navy Commendation Ribbon.

In December 1944 he became the first Commanding Officer of USCGC MACKINAW (WAGB-83), the first heavy duty U. S. icebreaker ever built. Especially designed for work in the Great Lakes, her homeport was at Cheboygan, MI. For meritorious service while commanding that ship, he received a Coast Guard Commendation Letter. The letter cited him for icebreaking on an unprecedented scale in the Great Lakes. This permitted tidewater Navy and Army vessels and merchant vessels to pass through the ice and deliver urgently needed supplies essential to the war effort.

After completing one year of student work at the National War College in June l955, he returned to Coast Guard Headquarters to serve in the Office of the Chief of Staff. On March 16, 1956, he was assigned as Deputy Chief of Staff of the Coast Guard. With his nomination by the President and with the approval of the Senate, he was advanced to the rank of Rear Admiral effective 1 July 1956. He was subsequently assigned as Commander, First Coast Guard District, Boston. On 1 July 1960 he assumed the dual post of Commander, Eastern Area and Commander, 3d Coast Guard District, New York. With the approval of the President and the Senate, he was appointed Assistant Commandant of the U. S. Coast Guard with rank of Vice Admiral effective from 12 February 1962. He assumed the duties of that office at Headquarters on 1 February.

On 23 April 1962 he was appointed Commandant of the U. S. Coast Guard with rank of Admiral. He succeeded the retiring Admiral Alfred C. Richmond on 1 June 1962. He was relieved by Admiral Willard J. Smith and retired from the USCG on 1 June 1966 with various awards.

On July 9, 1963, ADM Roland received the Legion of Merit from the Secretary of the Treasury C. Douglas Dillon in recognition of his outstanding record in maintaining a military readiness posture “unparalleled in the peacetime history of the Coast Guard.” On 21 January 1966 ADM Roland received the Distinguished Service Medal for the service’s swift response to the Navy’s request for patrol craft to assist in coastal surveillance in South Vietnam. His also skillfully guided the handling of the Cuban Exodus operations in the Straits of Florida in 1965. ADM Roland also went to Saigon during the summer of 1965 to confer with the Naval Coastal Surveillance Forces shortly after the arrival of the 82-foot cutters in South Vietnam. Based at Danang these 82-footers constituted Coast Guard Squadron One.

It was during ADM Roland’s administration that the Coast Guard’s long sought program for modernization of its fleet with medium and high endurance cutters got underway with the launching and christening of the first major cutter built since World War II. Mrs. Roland sponsored this first vessel, the 210-ft. Medium Endurance Cutter RELIANCE (WMEC-615) at Todd Shipyards, Houston, Texas, on May 11, 1963.

ADM Roland received The American Legion Distinguished Service Medal from the Robert L. Hague Merchant Marine Industries Post No. 12142, Department of New York, on 6 November 1965. He was cited for outstanding contributions to the American Merchant Marine and Safety of Life at Sea while chairing the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) Subcommittee of the Shipping Coordinating Committee. He also received recognition for being the U. S. Delegate to the Maritime Safety Committee of the Inter-Governmental Maritime Consultative Organization (IMCO) and for encouraging the inauguration and expansion of the Automated Merchant Vessel Report (ANVER ) System to both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.

We honor you, Edwin Roland.

(#Repost @The Patriot Files)

 

Ship’s Master William S. Chambers

2017-10-14 Chambers

William Chambers was en route to Hawaii on a cargo ship on December 7, 1941, when his captain announced news of the attack on Pearl Harbor. Chambers had been in effect training for war for two years. At 18, he entered the Pennsylvania State Nautical School in October 1939, shortly after WWII broke out in Europe, and the school had its students learn the ropes on different vessels of the U.S. Navy. During the war, Chambers made many dangerous voyages, none worse than a 1942 trip to the Soviet Union on which he lost three ships to torpedoes or mines. At war’s end, he was still at sea, carrying supplies for the invasion of Japan which were never needed.

We honor you, William Chambers.

(#Repost @Veteran’s History Project)