PVT Claire Martin

Martin

On April 25, 1951, his unit was ambushed as it pulled back from the Chinese attack near Chongpyong, South Korea. He was seriously wounded by a small arms bullet to his chest and died of those wounds on April 27, 1951 as he was being evacuated from a field hospital to a Mobile Army Surgical Hospital.

We honor you, Claire Martin.

(#Repost @National Purple Heart Hall of Honor)

LCpl Budd “Buddy” Michael Cote

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Budd M. Cote’ attended elementary, middle school and his freshman year of high school in Las Vegas, Nevada. His family relocated to Tucson, Arizona in 2001 due to his father’s employment. Budd was an avid hockey player since the early age of four years. He played all positions and became quite proficient while enjoying every game. Budd also ran track and field, cross country, and was very active in drama activities, photography and drawing free style sketches. Budd excelled at so many different aspects of the arts by playing guitar, singing in the choir, and enjoyed dancing. He loved all types of music and had a knack for knowing “which” band sang “which” song. In addition, Budd was active in martial arts and earned his black belt by the age of ten. One of the very best qualities he possessed was that he could make anyone laugh. He gave from the heart and compassion came naturally to him.

LCpl Budd M. Cote’ entered the USMC in July 2005 at MCRD in San Diego, California. He graduated from the Military Police Academy at Ft. Leonard Wood, Missouri and later trained as a Field Military Police Officer. He was assigned to the; Military Police, Marine Wing Support Squadron 373, Marine Wing Support Group 37, 3D Marine Air Wing, 1st Expeditionary Force-Forward (MWSS 373, MWSG 37, 3D MAW, 1 MEF.) and stationed at Marine Corps Air Station, Miramar, California. He deployed to Iraq in September 2006 where he provided convoy support and escorts near Fallujah. He was the driver of a Humvee, call sign “Havoc 2” and was killed when an improvised explosive device detonated on his convoy.

 

We honor you, Budd Cote.

(#Repost @American Legion Post 52)

Lt Tammie Jo Shults

U.S. Navy photo of Southwest Airlines pilot Tammie Jo Shults photo in 1992

Passengers aboard the tumultuous Southwest Airlines flight — during which one passenger was killed after nearly being ripped from the plane — are crediting pilot Tammie Jo Shults’ quick thinking with saving their lives.

The former Navy fighter pilot safely brought the plane down in Philadelphia after one of its engines exploded shortly after taking off from New York City.

“This is a true American Hero,” passenger Diana McBride Self said in a Facebook post about Shults, adding the pilot went back and personally spoke with passengers after the ordeal. “A huge thank you for her knowledge, guidance and bravery in a traumatic situation. God bless her and all the crew.”

But long before her quick-thinking maneuvers softly landed the damaged Southwest plane, Shults was a pioneer among female fighter pilots and faced resistance to even enlist.

Shults, raised on a New Mexico ranch, grew up dreaming of being a pilot as she watched planes fly overhead from the nearby Holloman Air Force Base, she recalled in a passage for the 2012 book “Military Fly Moms,” which profiled the careers of female pilots.

When she went to a retired military pilots lecture on career day her senior year of high school, the former colonel asked if she was lost.

“I mustered up the courage to assure him I was not and that I was interested in flying,” she wrote in a passage for the book. “He allowed me to stay but assured me there were no professional women pilots.”

A meeting with a female pilot while she was a junior at MidAmerican Nazarene University inspired her to keep at it.

“My heart jumped. Girls did fly!” she wrote in the book. “I set to work trying to break into the club.”

The Air Force rejected Shults, however — but wanted her brother. Shults toiled for a year until a recruiter processed her Navy application.

She met her husband — Dean Shults, who’s now also a Southwest pilot — during that time, who she described as her “knight in shining airplane.”

While Shults became one of the first women to fly the F/A-18, she recalled being relegated to support roles because female pilots couldn’t fly combat missions, she wrote in the book.

She retired in 1993, and lives with her husband and two children in San Antonio.

We honor you, Tammie Jo Shults.

(#Repost @American Military News)

LT Lane Schofield Anderson

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Lane Schofield Anderson was born February 14, 1896 in Richmond, Virginia to Justin K. and Fannie Anderson. He attended schools in Mercer, Mingo and Kanawha counties in West Virginia.

He graduated from Charleston High School in 1916. He excelled in track, becoming the first West Virginian to run the 100 yard dash in 10 seconds. He was a student at West Virginia University for a short time before entering Camp Benjamin Harrison for Officers Training, later being commissioned a Second Lieutenant. He married Julia L. de Gruyter on February 13, 1918. They had one child.

Lieutenant Anderson went overseas as a member of Company G, 26th Infantry, 27th Division. While in France he served under British Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig. This company took part in the Battle of Argonne and broke through the Hindenburg Line.

The testimony of men who served with Lieutenant Lane Anderson attests to his bravery in battle after taking command when the leader of his platoon was killed. Under heavy enemy fire, Anderson left his safe position to lead his men to their objective and was wounded. Various accounts were given to his family as to the exact manner of his death. By some accounts he died shortly after, but other reports state he was captured and died in a German prison. His official date of death is September 7, 1918.

In a sworn deposition given March 5, 1919, Sergeant Harry S. Lynk, a comrade of Lane Anderson stated that during the initial stages of their attack on the Hindenburg line, two platoons of Company G lost contact. In order to regain contact, Lieutenant Lane Anderson, braving heavy enemy fire, did reconnaissance in an effort to locate the men of the platoons of Company G. It was discovered that they had enough men to hold their front line position. Captain Hardy, who had been in command, was killed and full command fell to Lieutenant Anderson.

Enemy forces were on both flanks and Anderson made the decision that the position should be “put out of action” in order to spare the remaining men. Sergeant Lynk stated that it was “sure death to show yourself” and related how Anderson “jumped up on the top Himself” while firing a rifle and “loaded down with bombs” in an effort to lead his men to a safer position. At this time, Lane Anderson was wounded by machine gun bullets. “For this and other acts of bravery,” said Sergeant Lynk, “I Know Lt. Anderson should receive the highest decoration that could be awarded by any government.” Sergeant Lynk, who himself had been awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for bravery in the same battle, believed Lieutenant Lane Anderson more worthy of recognition than himself.

Lane Schofield Anderson was buried in Somme American Cemetery in Bony, France. For his bravery, he was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross posthumously. The award was presented to his widow, Julia L. Anderson. A VFW post was later named for him.

We honor you, Lane Schofield Anderson.

(#Repost @wvculture.org)

CPL Akira Akimoto

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Born in 1919 to immigrants from Yamaguchi, Japan, Akira Akimoto grew up in Honolulu. His mother was a maid and his father worked for Young Laundry Company. Akira went to Kaiulani Elementary and Kalakaua Intermediate and graduated from McKinley High School. After graduation, he worked at the Hawaiian Pine Company.

Akimoto was drafted and entered the army in November 1941. An original member of the 100th Infantry Battalion, he was first assigned to B Company and then to Headquarters Company, attaining the rank of corporal.

The 100th had many good baseball players, including Akimoto. While the 100th was in basic training at Camp McCoy, Wisconsin, a baseball team called the Aloha Team was formed. It played teams throughout the state of Wisconsin. Akimoto was second baseman and outfielder.

After the war he worked at Hickam Air Base in the supply warehouse and office.

We honor you, Akira Akimoto.

(#Repost @100thbattalion.org)

Joe Louis

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(1914-1981) One of the world’s best-known athletes, Louis’s enduring popularity was partly due to his sheer dominance: Of his 25 successful title defenses, nearly all came by knockout. But in winning, Louis also showed himself to be a gracious, even generous victor. He also drew praise for his support of the country’s war effort, as he enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1942 and donated prize money to military relief funds.

After reigning as heavyweight champion for 11 years and eight months, a record, Louis retired on March 1, 1949.

We honor you, Joe Louis.

(#Repost @biography.com)

SM 1 Douglas Albert Munro

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Of the 3,498 Medal of Honor recipients in American history, only one was from the U.S. Coast Guard: Signalman 1st Class Douglas Albert Munro. On this day 74 years ago, Munro sacrificed himself at the Matanikau River at Point Cruz in Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, while saving hundreds of his fellow service members.

In recognition, Munro was posthumously awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his “extraordinary heroism and conspicuous gallantry in action above and beyond the call of duty.” Munro remains the only member of the Coast Guard to earn this distinction.

Born in Vancouver, British Columbia, Munro grew up in South Cle Elum, Washington. He enlisted in the Coast Guard in 1939. Upon hearing that the Coast Guard had been ordered to man transport vessels in the Pacific during World War II, Munro pleaded with his executive officer to allow him to transfer to this mission. He was eventually successful and was assigned to transport duty supporting Marine landings at Guadalcanal during the Solomon Islands campaign.

On Sept. 27, 1942, nearly 500 Marines were tasked with crossing the Matanikau River at Point Cruz at Guadalcanal. However, the Marines faced imminent danger at the hands of a larger and more heavily armed than anticipated Japanese force.

Munro volunteered to lead the evacuation mission as the Marines were pinned in a vulnerable position by advancing Japanese forces. Munro led a group of small boats charged with protecting 24 Higgins landing craft that were attempting to extract the Marines.

As machine gun fire from the land continued, Munro positioned his Coast Guard craft between the Japanese and the Higgins boats to provide cover for the evacuation. Armed with only two small guns on his plywood boat, Munro successfully held off the Japanese attack, enabling nearly 500 Marines, including 25 wounded, to escape.

As the last Marines were safely under way and while turning back to rescue a grounded Higgins boat, Munro was fatally wounded. Still thinking of those Marines he was charged to protect, his final words were: “Did they get off?”

Munro exemplified the honor, valor, and patriotism that United States Coast Guard service men and women display in defending our nation’s waters. In honoring Munro, we recognize the Coast Guard’s vital role in protecting America’s maritime security.

Munro embodied the Coast Guard’s motto, semper paratus (“always ready”), in his heroic, decisive actions in Guadalcanal. Recognizing the crucial security the Coast Guard provides our nation, Congress and the president should strive to ensure this sea service remains always ready.

We honor you, Douglas Munro.

(#Repost @the Daily Signal)