Lt Col Michael P Anderson

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Lt. Col. Michael P. Anderson, was a United States Air Force officer and NASA astronaut. Anderson and his six fellow crew members died in the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster when the craft disintegrated during its re-entry into the Earth’s atmosphere on February 1, 2003.

Michael P. Anderson, a native of Eastern Washington who considered Spokane his hometown, was the payload commander on board the Columbia. His dreams of flight and space exploration were deeply rooted in his life, as was his love of family and his faith. He made his dreams become reality through hard work, perserverance and vision, and he shared these values with his children and young people wherever he went.

“I’m having a great time. This is what I wanted to do since I was a little kid. I urge you all to remember that if you apply yourself, work hard to be persistent, and don’t give up, you can achieve anything you want to achieve.”

We honor you, Michael Anderson.

(#Repost @Mobius Science Center, Spokane)

 

SPC Beverly Sue Clark

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Beverly Clark (21 May 1967 – 25 February 1991).  SPC Clark was killed during the SCUD Missle attack on the U.S. barracks at Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.  She was one of the 96 U.S. Army Soldiers who were Killed In Action during the Persian Gulf War.

Note:  Susan Ann Sumpter-Loebig informed us she brought Beverly home (Desert Storm Combat Women “DSCW”).  Thank you for taking the time to nominate Beverly.

We honor you, Beverly Clark.

(Newspaper submission by: Susan Ann Sumpter-Loebig; Photo submission via http://www.findagrave.com; #Repost https://army.togetherweserved.com)

John Cole

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John Cole was called to active duty from the Marine Reserve in 1950 and assigned to the 5th Marine Regiment in northeastern Korea. In November, Cole’s unit was hit at Yudam west of the Chosin Reservoir by a massive Chinese onslaught in unimaginable 40-below-zero weather. Cole was wounded but continued to fight as the Marines battled through a gauntlet of enemy fire over a tortuous road to temporary safety in the encircled town of Hagaru. Cole was on the last medical evacuation flight to leave. For its action at Chosin and subsequent breakout to Hungnam on the coast, Cole’s lst Marine Division was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation. Cole was awarded with 3 purple hearts.

We honor you, John Cole.

(Submission photo by: Ninzel Rasmuson, #Repost @https://veteransday.utah.edu)

LCpl William “Billy” David Spencer

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When Lance Corporal William “Billy” D. Spencer saw his squad leader wounded in an Iraq shootout, he did the only thing he could do: He tried to save his commanding officer.

Spencer was killed in the process, hit by enemy fire on Dec. 28, 2006, in Al Anbar province. Nearly two years later, Spencer was awarded the Silver Star — the U.S. military’s third-highest honor — in a ceremony at Nashville State Community College on Sunday afternoon.

“I knew when he joined that he was going to give all he had to give,” said Julia Lockaby, Spencer’s mother. “My greatest fear came true.”

Spencer was born in Cincinnati but grew up in Paris, Tenn., where he played football at Henry County High School and enjoyed reading to schoolchildren, said father David Spencer.

After graduating in 2004, Billy Spencer trained with the Nashville-based I Company reserve unit of the 3rd Battalion, 24th Marine Regiment. In late 2006, Spencer and 75 Nashville-based members of the 3rd Battalion went to Iraq with the 1st Battalion, 24th Regiment.

Killed during a firefight, Spencer, a rifleman, was three months into his Iraq tour when his squad went out on a mission to investigate a suspected enemy sniper. When his squad leader went down in an ensuing firefight, Spencer was shot trying to drag him to safety.

Both died from their injuries.

“I got a text message on what he had done, and when I read it … I made it a personal mission for him to be recognized,” said Maj. Sean M. Roche of the 3rd Battalion.

Spencer had previously been publicly recognized with three other fallen Marines in May 2007, before the Silver Star award. At Sunday’s ceremony, his parents were presented with the award in front of a theater packed with Spencer’s fellow Marines.

We honor you, William Spencer.

(#Repost @Fallen Heroes Project)

2LT Jackie Robinson

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In 1942, Jackie Robinson was drafted into the military to a segregated cavalry unit in Kansas. There he also faced discrimination when he and other colored soldiers applied for Officer Candidate School (OCS) and were later accepted after much fighting and debate. After completing it, he was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the United States military.

Later in his career, in 1944, he was confronted with another situation. While on a military bus, he was asked to move to the back (similarly to Rosa Parks). After he refused, he was taken into custody and eventually transferred out of his unit. After being transferred, Jackie joined another unit but was court-martialed after false accusations by the prejudiced officer and jury that confirmed his removal from the military. Jackie would later join a semi-professional football team and eventually begin his baseball career.

We honor you, Jackie Robinson.

(Submission by: Isabella Parry. #Repost @Jackie Robinson Changed Sports)

MAJ Donald G. Carr

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Army Maj. Donald G. Carr, 32, of San Antonio, accounted for on Aug. 19, 2015, will be buried May 11, at San Antonio National Cemetery. On July 6, 1971, Carr was assigned to the Mobile Launch Team 3, 5th Special Forces Group, as an observer in an OV-10A aircraft that supported an eight-man Special Forces reconnaissance team. During his mission, his aircraft encountered bad weather. Shortly afterward, the ground team heard an explosion to their northeast, which they believed to be that of an OV-10A. They failed to locate the crash site, however, and Carr was declared missing in action.

Between September 1991 and March 2014, joint U.S./Lao Peoples’ Democratic Republic teams conducted more than 25 investigations and site surveys, but could not locate his remains.

In April 2014, a Vietnamese citizen contacted American officials, claiming to know about possible American remains in Kon Tum Province, Vietnam. Wreckage, photos, personal effects, and remains were located and transferred to DPAA, and later identified as Carr’s.

To identify Carr’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used circumstantial evidence and DNA analysis, including mitochondrial DNA.

The support from the government and the people of Vietnam was vital to the success of this recovery.

Today there are 1,598 American servicemen and civilians still unaccounted for from the Vietnam War. Carr’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, along with others unaccounted-for from the Vietnam War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

We honor you, Donald Carr.

(Submission by: Miah Parry #Repost @powmiafamilies)