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LT. PAUL RICHARD MARTINI, 37, of New York, a firef LT. PAUL RICHARD MARTINI, 37, of New York, a firefighter for the New York Fire Department, wasn't just going to take the fire captain's test. He was going to ace it. "He told me he was going to get 100 percent on that test, and we all believed him because he studied for six hours every day he wasn't working," said his wife, Lisa. Yet Martini still found time for his passions: his family, his garden, fishing and skiing. "He was the type of young man you could rely on," said his mother, Mary. "You could call him up for anything and he'd be there. I feel bad he won't be there for his little girl." 

We honor you, Paul Martini.

Copyright © 2001 The Associated Press  #Repost @http://bravestmemorial.net/html/members/martini_paul_lt_e201.html 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11

LT. PAUL RICHARD MARTINI, 37, of New York, a firefighter for the New York Fire Department, wasn't just going to take the fire captain's test. He was going to ace it. "He told me he was going to get 100 percent on that test, and we all believed him because he studied for six hours every day he wasn't working," said his wife, Lisa. Yet Martini still found time for his passions: his family, his garden, fishing and skiing. "He was the type of young man you could rely on," said his mother, Mary. "You could call him up for anything and he'd be there. I feel bad he won't be there for his little girl."

We honor you, Paul Martini.

Copyright © 2001 The Associated Press #Repost @http://bravestmemorial.net/html/members/martini_paul_lt_e201.html

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11
...

One balmy night in the fall of 2000, an off-duty b One balmy night in the fall of 2000, an off-duty battalion chief, John Paolillo, stood outside an apartment fire on the Upper East Side when a police officer told everyone to clear the sidewalk. A reporter waited for Chief Paolillo, who was in street clothes, to flash his badge at the officer. But the chief just moved away.

He could be like that. Or not. When he was made captain of Engine 53 in East Harlem, he arrived at the firehouse with a few ideas on how things should run. The men gave him a nickname: Mussolini. But Chief Paolillo was a person big enough to realize an officer didn't need a heavy hand. The nickname was shortened: The Moose.

His theory on junior firefighters was that they should keep their mouths shut until they had enough years on the job to know a thing or two. He basked in company pride. Once a new firefighter stopped by Engine 53 before his first day and hopped on the rig when they got a call.

"So, how'd you get assigned to 53?" Chief Paolillo asked over the blaring siren. The new kid replied that, actually, it hadn't been his first choice. The driver slammed on the brakes. "Get out," Chief Paolillo said.

The Chief was impatient to save lives, and, at age 51, kept himself in top shape to do so. He brought firefighting manuals on vacation and read them on the beach. He ran marathons.

His younger brother, Joe, recalled once stopping by a firehouse with him to see a friend. A young firefighter they didn't know opened the door and greeted them curtly. Joe Paolillo waited for his brother to show his badge. But Chief Paolillo didn't.

We honor you, John Paolillo.

#Repost @http://www.legacy.com/Sept11/Story.aspx?PersonID=151791 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11

One balmy night in the fall of 2000, an off-duty battalion chief, John Paolillo, stood outside an apartment fire on the Upper East Side when a police officer told everyone to clear the sidewalk. A reporter waited for Chief Paolillo, who was in street clothes, to flash his badge at the officer. But the chief just moved away.

He could be like that. Or not. When he was made captain of Engine 53 in East Harlem, he arrived at the firehouse with a few ideas on how things should run. The men gave him a nickname: Mussolini. But Chief Paolillo was a person big enough to realize an officer didn't need a heavy hand. The nickname was shortened: The Moose.

His theory on junior firefighters was that they should keep their mouths shut until they had enough years on the job to know a thing or two. He basked in company pride. Once a new firefighter stopped by Engine 53 before his first day and hopped on the rig when they got a call.

"So, how'd you get assigned to 53?" Chief Paolillo asked over the blaring siren. The new kid replied that, actually, it hadn't been his first choice. The driver slammed on the brakes. "Get out," Chief Paolillo said.

The Chief was impatient to save lives, and, at age 51, kept himself in top shape to do so. He brought firefighting manuals on vacation and read them on the beach. He ran marathons.

His younger brother, Joe, recalled once stopping by a firehouse with him to see a friend. A young firefighter they didn't know opened the door and greeted them curtly. Joe Paolillo waited for his brother to show his badge. But Chief Paolillo didn't.

We honor you, John Paolillo.

#Repost @http://www.legacy.com/Sept11/Story.aspx?PersonID=151791

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11
...

Karl Joseph: He was a fire fighter. A member of Co Karl Joseph:
He was a fire fighter. A member of Company 207. He was born in Haiti, became a US citizen, and grew up in Brooklyn. He was 25 years old. 

Karl immigrated to Brooklyn from Haiti when he was just a child with his parents and 8 siblings. He joined the fire department in 2000. He was what they called a “probie”, a probationary firefighter. Apparently, the higher ups played pranks on him, which it’s said he took with great humor. He had a big smile and a great laugh. And as they have described, he was “top-notch” at his job. 

Since 9/11, there has been a foundation in his name, the F.F. Karl Henri Joseph Education Fund providing educational resources to children in Haiti. 

We honor you, Karl Joseph. 

#Repost @https://musingsoffigarobello.wordpress.com/2018/09/11/karl-henri-joseph-9-11-hero-and-my-guardian-angel/ 
#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11

Karl Joseph:
He was a fire fighter. A member of Company 207. He was born in Haiti, became a US citizen, and grew up in Brooklyn. He was 25 years old.

Karl immigrated to Brooklyn from Haiti when he was just a child with his parents and 8 siblings. He joined the fire department in 2000. He was what they called a “probie”, a probationary firefighter. Apparently, the higher ups played pranks on him, which it’s said he took with great humor. He had a big smile and a great laugh. And as they have described, he was “top-notch” at his job.

Since 9/11, there has been a foundation in his name, the F.F. Karl Henri Joseph Education Fund providing educational resources to children in Haiti.

We honor you, Karl Joseph.

#Repost @https://musingsoffigarobello.wordpress.com/2018/09/11/karl-henri-joseph-9-11-hero-and-my-guardian-angel/
#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11
...

Sgt. Maj. Lacey B. Ivory, 42, was senior enlisted Sgt. Maj. Lacey B. Ivory, 42, was senior enlisted military assistant in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Manpower and Reserve Affairs.

He earned degrees from Des Moines Area Community College, the State University of New York and the University of Maryland, where he received a master's degree in education.

His 24-year career in the U.S. Army included tours of duty at Ft. Riley, Kan.; Ft. Jackson, S.C.; Germany; the Army Recruiting Command in Des Moines, Ia.; Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind.; and the Army Space Command at Peterson AFB in Colorado. His awards and decorations include the #PurpleHeart, #LegionofMerit, #MeritoriousServiceMedal with three Oak Leaf Clusters, #ArmyCommendationMedal with three Oak Leaf Clusters, the #ArmyAchievementMedal with four Oak Leaf Clusters, and the #ArmyGoodConductMedal.

He was a founding member of the Heidelberg Gospel Service and a deacon at Emmanuel Missionary Baptist Church in Colorado. Always eager to help young people, he was active in Big Brothers.

Survivors include his wife, Lt. Col. Deborah W. Ivory; daughters Adenika, Maisha, Quawana and Rashida; parents John and Redia, and seven brothers and sisters.

We honor you, Lacey Ivory.

#Repost @https://archive.defense.gov/home/features/2011/0911_911/pentagon-victims.aspx 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #veteran #army #kia #fallenhero #9-11

Sgt. Maj. Lacey B. Ivory, 42, was senior enlisted military assistant in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Manpower and Reserve Affairs.

He earned degrees from Des Moines Area Community College, the State University of New York and the University of Maryland, where he received a master's degree in education.

His 24-year career in the U.S. Army included tours of duty at Ft. Riley, Kan.; Ft. Jackson, S.C.; Germany; the Army Recruiting Command in Des Moines, Ia.; Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind.; and the Army Space Command at Peterson AFB in Colorado. His awards and decorations include the #PurpleHeart, #LegionofMerit, #MeritoriousServiceMedal with three Oak Leaf Clusters, #ArmyCommendationMedal with three Oak Leaf Clusters, the #ArmyAchievementMedal with four Oak Leaf Clusters, and the #ArmyGoodConductMedal.

He was a founding member of the Heidelberg Gospel Service and a deacon at Emmanuel Missionary Baptist Church in Colorado. Always eager to help young people, he was active in Big Brothers.

Survivors include his wife, Lt. Col. Deborah W. Ivory; daughters Adenika, Maisha, Quawana and Rashida; parents John and Redia, and seven brothers and sisters.

We honor you, Lacey Ivory.

#Repost @https://archive.defense.gov/home/features/2011/0911_911/pentagon-victims.aspx

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #veteran #army #kia #fallenhero #9-11
...

Richard "Ricky" John Tanagretta, age 65, passed in Richard "Ricky" John Tanagretta, age 65, passed in the comfort of his home surrounded by his family on September 24, 2019. He passed as a result of injuries and illnesses sustained operating at Manhattan Box 8087 on September 11, 2001 while working the "greatest job in the world" with the FDNY. 

Richard worked as a FDNY Firefighter for 26 years. He was also an Instructor for the New York State and Orange County Fire Academies, mentoring many generations of first responders. He was a past chief of the Pine Bush Volunteer Fire Department, where he was a member for 27 years, touching the lives of many. When he wasn't spending what little free time he had welding gadgets in his garage, he could be found riding down the road on his fire engine red Harley Davidson, wind blowing in his handlebar mustache. He was a member of the New York City Fire Riders, who spent their free time supporting and helping others. Richard was a loving son, husband, father, brother, grandfather, mentor, and friend. We will all miss his humor, sarcasm, and love. 

We honor you, Richard Tanagretta.

#Repost @https://www.legacy.com/obituaries/recordonline/obituary.aspx?n=richard-j-tanagretta&pid=194005951&fhid=22179 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #LEO #9-11 #fallenhero #post9-11illness

Richard "Ricky" John Tanagretta, age 65, passed in the comfort of his home surrounded by his family on September 24, 2019. He passed as a result of injuries and illnesses sustained operating at Manhattan Box 8087 on September 11, 2001 while working the "greatest job in the world" with the FDNY.

Richard worked as a FDNY Firefighter for 26 years. He was also an Instructor for the New York State and Orange County Fire Academies, mentoring many generations of first responders. He was a past chief of the Pine Bush Volunteer Fire Department, where he was a member for 27 years, touching the lives of many. When he wasn't spending what little free time he had welding gadgets in his garage, he could be found riding down the road on his fire engine red Harley Davidson, wind blowing in his handlebar mustache. He was a member of the New York City Fire Riders, who spent their free time supporting and helping others. Richard was a loving son, husband, father, brother, grandfather, mentor, and friend. We will all miss his humor, sarcasm, and love.

We honor you, Richard Tanagretta.

#Repost @https://www.legacy.com/obituaries/recordonline/obituary.aspx?n=richard-j-tanagretta&pid=194005951&fhid=22179

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #LEO #9-11 #fallenhero #post9-11illness
...

By Simone Cannizzaro, Brian’s father : On Sept. By Simone Cannizzaro, Brian’s father :

On Sept. 11th‚ Brian was 30 years old. He was working the day shift at Ladder 101 in the Red Hook section of Brooklyn‚ NY. Brian was married and the proud father of 8-month-old Christopher‚ who he actually delivered himself‚ under the watchful eye of the doctor in the delivery room‚ on national television.

On that day when I awoke and put TV on‚ I saw the Trade Center on fire and smoke filling the sky over Manhattan. No one at that time really knew what was going on. Then I saw the second tower hit. I knew immediately this was no accident. Fear came over me‚ for I knew Brian would be there. Not hearing any word from Brian for a long time‚ I feared the worst.

Being a retired firefighter of 32 years myself‚ I got my gear that I had in the garage and set out for the Trade Center. When I arrived at the SI ferry‚ I was told no one was being allowed to cross over to the site. I knew the chief in charge‚ and when I told him my son was there I was allowed to cross. When I arrived at the site‚ I could not believe my eyes. TV did not do justice to what I saw in person.

After many long hours of searching and asking questions‚ I knew the answer to my questions all too well. Brian and his entire company were gone. Now I had to come home and break the news to his mom and his wife and his brothers. Not easy.

The night before this nightmare‚ Brian and I were on the phone talking about all the work we were doing on his house to make necessary repairs that had to be done. The thing I remember most of our conversation is how we ended it. I said‚ I love you‚ BRIAN‚ and he said‚ I love you‚ POP‚ and that’s all I care to remember about that whole nightmarish day.

The pain never goes away. 

We honor you, Brian Cannizzaro.

#Repost @https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/brian-cannizzaro/

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11

By Simone Cannizzaro, Brian’s father :

On Sept. 11th‚ Brian was 30 years old. He was working the day shift at Ladder 101 in the Red Hook section of Brooklyn‚ NY. Brian was married and the proud father of 8-month-old Christopher‚ who he actually delivered himself‚ under the watchful eye of the doctor in the delivery room‚ on national television.

On that day when I awoke and put TV on‚ I saw the Trade Center on fire and smoke filling the sky over Manhattan. No one at that time really knew what was going on. Then I saw the second tower hit. I knew immediately this was no accident. Fear came over me‚ for I knew Brian would be there. Not hearing any word from Brian for a long time‚ I feared the worst.

Being a retired firefighter of 32 years myself‚ I got my gear that I had in the garage and set out for the Trade Center. When I arrived at the SI ferry‚ I was told no one was being allowed to cross over to the site. I knew the chief in charge‚ and when I told him my son was there I was allowed to cross. When I arrived at the site‚ I could not believe my eyes. TV did not do justice to what I saw in person.

After many long hours of searching and asking questions‚ I knew the answer to my questions all too well. Brian and his entire company were gone. Now I had to come home and break the news to his mom and his wife and his brothers. Not easy.

The night before this nightmare‚ Brian and I were on the phone talking about all the work we were doing on his house to make necessary repairs that had to be done. The thing I remember most of our conversation is how we ended it. I said‚ I love you‚ BRIAN‚ and he said‚ I love you‚ POP‚ and that’s all I care to remember about that whole nightmarish day.

The pain never goes away.

We honor you, Brian Cannizzaro.

#Repost @https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/brian-cannizzaro/

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11
...

Andrew (Andy) Fredericks was killed while operatin Andrew (Andy) Fredericks was killed while operating as a member of FDNY Squad 18 in response to the terrorist attacks of September 11th, 2001. 

Prior to his appointment to the FDNY, Andy began his career as a member of the Alexandria Fire Department in Northern Virginia.

We honor you, Andrew Fredericks.

#Repost @https://frederickstrainingdays.com/ 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11

Andrew (Andy) Fredericks was killed while operating as a member of FDNY Squad 18 in response to the terrorist attacks of September 11th, 2001.

Prior to his appointment to the FDNY, Andy began his career as a member of the Alexandria Fire Department in Northern Virginia.

We honor you, Andrew Fredericks.

#Repost @https://frederickstrainingdays.com/

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11
...

Raymond M. Downey was the battalion chief in charg Raymond M. Downey was the battalion chief in charge of special operations in the New York City Fire Department.

Here's his son, Chuck, a fire lieutenant: "Dad joined the Fire Department on April 7, 1962. Coming on in the 60's, they went to a lot of fires. The war years, they termed it. In 1995 he was assigned to Special Operations Command, SOC is the acronym, as chief of rescue operations. . . .

"He was on the Gilmore Commission to fight domestic terrorism. No one's going to see it all, but I don't think anyone thought of the World Trade Center. . . .

"When the south tower went down, there was a lot of Maydays. He survived. A lot of the top brass did. These are all guys with 30- plus years. They went back in. There were two young firemen, he told them, not in the nicest language, to get out of here."

Here's Chief Downey's daughter, Marie Tortorici: "Mommy, Rosalie, is Italian. Daddy's Irish. He would have been 64 on Sept. 19. He's very spiritual. He was in Oklahoma City after the bombing. Gov. Keating gave him a set of rosary beads. He wore them every day. Well, they broke, and he kept them in his pocket. He had them with him, because they're not home. . . .

"When I was a little girl, he was working three jobs to support the family, and he was always too busy to come to the school to do fire prevention week. Last year, when my daughter was in first grade, he went to the school for fire prevention week. I don't know. It's so sad, everything. But a good thing came out of this. My sister, my father called her the baby, we just found out she's pregnant. So she felt like it was a blessing from my father." 

We honor you, Raymond Downey.

Profile published in THE NEW YORK TIMES on October 22, 2001.  #Repost @http://www.heroportraits.org/Gallery/default.aspx?id=209 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11

Raymond M. Downey was the battalion chief in charge of special operations in the New York City Fire Department.

Here's his son, Chuck, a fire lieutenant: "Dad joined the Fire Department on April 7, 1962. Coming on in the 60's, they went to a lot of fires. The war years, they termed it. In 1995 he was assigned to Special Operations Command, SOC is the acronym, as chief of rescue operations. . . .

"He was on the Gilmore Commission to fight domestic terrorism. No one's going to see it all, but I don't think anyone thought of the World Trade Center. . . .

"When the south tower went down, there was a lot of Maydays. He survived. A lot of the top brass did. These are all guys with 30- plus years. They went back in. There were two young firemen, he told them, not in the nicest language, to get out of here."

Here's Chief Downey's daughter, Marie Tortorici: "Mommy, Rosalie, is Italian. Daddy's Irish. He would have been 64 on Sept. 19. He's very spiritual. He was in Oklahoma City after the bombing. Gov. Keating gave him a set of rosary beads. He wore them every day. Well, they broke, and he kept them in his pocket. He had them with him, because they're not home. . . .

"When I was a little girl, he was working three jobs to support the family, and he was always too busy to come to the school to do fire prevention week. Last year, when my daughter was in first grade, he went to the school for fire prevention week. I don't know. It's so sad, everything. But a good thing came out of this. My sister, my father called her the baby, we just found out she's pregnant. So she felt like it was a blessing from my father."

We honor you, Raymond Downey.

Profile published in THE NEW YORK TIMES on October 22, 2001. #Repost @http://www.heroportraits.org/Gallery/default.aspx?id=209

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11
...

Dennis A. Cross‚ 60‚ battalion chief‚ FDNY‚ Battalion 57. He joined the FDNY in 1963 after a two-year tour of duty in Vietnam‚ where he served in an Army communications unit. Cross served on a Commissioner’s committee to draft new firefighting regulations and trained upcoming chiefs in a mentoring program.

Known as Captain Fearless‚ he followed in the footsteps of his father who was a New York firefighter‚ as is Cross’s son. Cross was devoted to his wife‚ three daughters‚ and three grandchildren.

He had a saying that he loved. ‘Take care of men‚ and men will take care of you.’ 

We honor you, Dennis Cross.

#Repost @https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/dennis-a-cross/ 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #veteran #kia #fallenhero #9-11

Dennis A. Cross‚ 60‚ battalion chief‚ FDNY‚ Battalion 57. He joined the FDNY in 1963 after a two-year tour of duty in Vietnam‚ where he served in an Army communications unit. Cross served on a Commissioner’s committee to draft new firefighting regulations and trained upcoming chiefs in a mentoring program.

Known as Captain Fearless‚ he followed in the footsteps of his father who was a New York firefighter‚ as is Cross’s son. Cross was devoted to his wife‚ three daughters‚ and three grandchildren.

He had a saying that he loved. ‘Take care of men‚ and men will take care of you.’

We honor you, Dennis Cross.

#Repost @https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/dennis-a-cross/

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #veteran #kia #fallenhero #9-11
...

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