CPL Jessica Ellis

2018-7-4 Ellis.jpg

Jessica Ellis was born in Burley, Idaho on June 26, 1983. She graduated from Lakeview (Oregon) High School in 2002, where she was active in cross country, track and field, and the swim team. After high school graduation she attended Central Oregon Community College in Bend, while working summers as a US Forest Service firefighter on the Fremont National Forest in southern Oregon.

In September 2004, Jessica entered the US Army with the goal of becoming a Medic. After successful completion of basic training at Ft. Leonard Wood, MO, and the Combat Medic training program at Ft. Sam Houston, TX, she was assigned to the Army’s 101st Airborne Division. CPL Ellis completed her first 12-month combat tour in Iraq in 2006. She earned the Combat Medic Badge on this first tour for treating a wounded buddy under direct enemy fire. She left for a second Iraq tour in October 2007. She served both tours as a Combat Medic with the 2nd Brigade Special Troops Battalion, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault). Fellow soldiers called her “Doc” Ellis.

In April, 2008 CPL Ellis and four other soldiers escaped serious injury during a night time “road clearing” operation in Baghdad when their vehicle was struck by a roadside bomb. They were riding in a “Buffalo”, a heavily armored vehicle that is primarily used by combat engineers to clear roadside bombs. Jessica sustained superficial injuries in the attack which wrecked the armored vehicle. She returned to the road clearing duties because she didn’t want “her guys” to be out on missions without a Medic.

Her combat engineer unit was attacked again while on combat patrol in NW Baghdad the evening of May 11, 2008 (Mother’s Day). The Buffalo armored vehicle in which Jessica was riding was struck by at least one EFP (explosively formed penetrator) warhead. Jessica died in the attack. She was awarded the Bronze Star and Purple Heart.

CPL Ellis was buried with full military honors at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, VA. Her courage, cheerful spirit, and devotion to fellow soldiers were noted many times to her parents and family by the 101st Airborne Division. She is honored at the Division’s memorial at Ft. Campbell, Kentucky. CPL Ellis’s name is also engraved on the Afghan-Iraqi Freedom Memorial in Salem, Oregon where more than one hundred of Oregon’s fallen veterans are honored.

We honor you, Jessica Ellis.

(#Repost @Fallen Heroes Project)

RM2 Julius Heinrich Otto “Henry” Pieper

2018-6-26 Pieper

Julius (pictured left), born of German immigrant parents, worked together with his twin, Louie, for Burlington Railroad and enlisted together with him in the Navy. Both were radio operators and both were on the same unwieldy flat-bottom boat, Landing Ship Tank Number 523 (LST-523), making the Channel crossing from Falmouth, England, to Utah Beach 13 days after the June 6 D-Day landings.

The LST-523 mission was to deliver supplies at the Normandy beachhead and remove the wounded. It never got there.

The vessel struck an underwater mine and sank off the coast. Of the 145 Navy crew members, 117 were found perished. Survivors’ accounts speak of a major storm on the Channel with pitched waves that tossed the boat mercilessly before the explosion that shattered the vessel.

While his brother Louie’s body was soon found, identified and laid to rest, Julius’ remains were only recovered in 1961 by French salvage divers who found them in the vessel’s radio room. He was interred as an “Unknown” at the Ardennes American Cemetery in Neuville, Belgium, also devoted to the fallen of World War II, in the region that saw the bloody Battle of the Bulge.

Julius’ remains might have stayed among those of 13 other troops from the doomed LST-523 still resting unidentified at the Ardennes cemetery. But in 2017, a U.S. agency that tracks missing combatants using witness accounts and DNA testing identified him.

The Pieper family asked that Louie’s grave in Normandy be relocated to make room for his twin brother at his side.

“They are finally together again, side by side, where they should be,” said their niece, Susan Lawrence, 56, of California.

We honor you, Julius Pieper.

(Submission by: Miah Parry. #Repost @MSN news)

RM2 Ludwig Julius Wilhelm “Louie” Pieper

2018-6-26 Pieper

Louie (pictured left), born of German immigrant parents, worked for Burlington Railroad with his twin brother and enlisted together with him in the Navy. Both were radio operators and both were on the same unwieldy flat-bottom boat, Landing Ship Tank Number 523 (LST-523), making the Channel crossing from Falmouth, England, to Utah Beach 13 days after the June 6 D-Day landings.

The LST-523 mission was to deliver supplies at the Normandy beachhead and remove the wounded. It never got there.

The vessel struck an underwater mine and sank off the coast. Of the 145 Navy crew members, 117 were found perished. Survivors’ accounts speak of a major storm on the Channel with pitched waves that tossed the boat mercilessly before the explosion that shattered the vessel.

Louie’s body was laid to rest in what now is the Normandy American Cemetery.

We honor you, Louie Pieper.

(Submission by: Miah Parry. #Repost @MSN news)

HA1c Fred Faulkner Lester

2018-6-12 Lester

Fred Faulkner Lester was born in Downers Grove, Illinois on April 29, 1926. He joined the United States Naval Reserve on November 1, 1943 when he was just 17 years old. He was placed on active service with the United States Navy, trained as a medical corpsman, and assigned to the 1st Battalion, 22nd Marine Regiment, 6th Marine Division.

Seventy years ago today during the Battle of Okinawa, then 19-year-old Lester, now a Hospitalman Apprentice 1st Class, rescued one wounded Marine from under heavy enemy fire, ignored his own grievous wounds, and instructed his comrades in care for the injured until he perished.

As is usual for members of the Naval Service awarded the Medal of Honor, a warship carried the young hero’s name. The USS Lester (DE-1022), a Dealey-class destroyer escort, served with our Navy from June 14, 1957 through December 14, 1973. The vessel was scrapped in 1974.

Lester today rests in peace in the Clarendon Hills Cemetery, Darien, Illinois.

We honor you, Fred Lester.

(#Repost @Their Finest Hour)

Larry Gail Williamson

2018-6-11 Williamson.png

Larry G. Williamson was February 9, 1947, in Lincoln County, West Virginia, the only son of four children born to John B. and Georgia Napier Williamson.

During high school at Harts, Larry was the only boy in his class to become a member of the National Honor Society. He was on the varsity basketball team and served on the school newspaper and as secretary treasurer of his senior class. After graduation in 1964 he attended Marshall University’s Logan branch for two years.

On September 9, 1967, at the age of 20, Larry married Wanda Brumfield and moved to Columbus, Ohio, where he became manager of car parts and tires at a Firestone Automotive Center.

In January 1969, Larry was drafted from West Virginia. While on a bus taking him for Army training, he was among the draftees separated and reassigned to the Marines. He received basic training at Camp Pendleton, California, and after a brief visit home was ordered to Vietnam and assigned to the 5th Marine Division. He soon received a promotion to Lance Corporal.

In Vietnam, Larry was assigned as a squad leader in the First Platoon of Company G. On March 11, 1970, the squad was acting as a blocking force and was located approximately 2 miles northeast of An Hoa Combat Base in Quang Nam Province. Lance Corporal Larry G. Williamson was killed when a well concealed explosive device detonated. A squad corpsman rushed to his aid but death had been instantaneous. According to First Lieutenant W. T. Collins, tribute was paid to Larry during a memorial service held on March 13.

The body of Lance Corporal Larry G. Williamson was returned to his hometown and was interred in the Little Harts Cemetery.

We honor you, Larry Williamson.

(#Repost @wvculture.org)

Capt Edward A Nachowitz

2018-5-25 Nachowitz

Nachowitz was assigned to 93TCS, 439TCG, 9AF USAAF. He completed 4 x combat missions, with 500+ combat hrs. He failed to Return (FTR) on a re-supply mission to Bastogne, towing 2 Waco gliders.He was hit by flak in fuel tanks, broke formation and released gliders, allowing crew to bale. Nachowitz remained at controls to ensure crews departure, and was subsequently killed in the crash.

We honor you, Edward Nachowitz.

(#Repost @American Air Museum in Britain)