fbpx

our impact

Honor365 creates lasting impact on the lives of veterans, first responders, and their families in the areas of employment, education, healthcare, and housing. Our mission is to provide resource and referral services to those we serve in order to work towards our vision of a world without suicide. This is accomplished through our organization working with multiple, vetted providers who are a resource to those we serve. Individuals and families who contact our organization will be referred to organizations and companies who assist in the Honor365 pillar areas. In the event you need assistance, contact us. We honor you, and we want the best for you and your family.

EDUCATION

Honor365 partners and collaborates with education institutions and existing programs to help veterans and first responders to reach their education goals and to address their health. Contact us to receive additional information about programs, particularly related to education and outpatient therapy. We can assist you with connecting to programs that support your education goals. Additionally, if you would like to be part of a research program to address reducing PTSD, and receive outpatient therapy free of charge, we will help you with the referral process.

EMPLOYMENT

Honor365 is providing resource and referral services for veterans and first responders to obtain gainful employment. We work with vetted employment providers to help those we serve access employment services. We understand that transitions can be stressful, and we can help refer individuals to resources that are helpful. Contact us for more information.

HEALTHCARE

Honor365 is partnered with private industry and public institutions to provide free services for outpatient therapy for veterans, first responders, and their families. We encourage individuals, family members, and/or friends to contact us for additional information. If you would like to support the mental wellness of those we serve, please considering donate to our cause. Every contribution counts.

HOUSING

Honor365 is partnered with companies to help veterans and first responders locate affordable housing while improving the needs of their home, if needed. Robin’s Tool Bin, is an Honor365 program that has a box trailer loaded with equipment to help with small maintenance projects and repairs. Additionally, we work with corporations who would like to volunteer to support our efforts. Contact us to receive additional information.

%

Employment for veterans were unemployed in November 2020

%

The percentage of full-time student veterans who dropped out of college of enrollment in 2017.

%

In 2019, there was a 2.1% decrease in the estimated number of homeless veterans nationwide. 793 veterans now have shelter.

%

During a 20-year period, the total suicide rate in the United States increased 35% from 10.5% per 100,000 in 1999 to 14.2% per 100,000 per 100,000 in 2018.

With regret, the FDNY announced the death of retir With regret, the FDNY announced the death of retired Firefighter Andrew S. Gargiulo, E-160, appointed November 14, 1999, retired February 28, 2006, which occurred on November 6, 2019. This member bravely served this Department protecting life and property in the City of New York in the rescue and recovery at Manhattan Box 5-5-8087 World Trade Center. The heartfelt sympathy of the entire department is extended to the family, relatives, and friends of the deceased in the midst of the great loss that they and the department have sustained. His funeral was held on Staten Island on November 13, 2019.

We honor you, Andrew Gargiulo.

– Fire News story and photo submitted by Mark Little courtesy of the New York Association of Fire Chaplains 
#Repost @https://firenews.com/fdnys-andrew-s-gargiulo/ 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #911 #fallenhero #post9-11illness

With regret, the FDNY announced the death of retired Firefighter Andrew S. Gargiulo, E-160, appointed November 14, 1999, retired February 28, 2006, which occurred on November 6, 2019. This member bravely served this Department protecting life and property in the City of New York in the rescue and recovery at Manhattan Box 5-5-8087 World Trade Center. The heartfelt sympathy of the entire department is extended to the family, relatives, and friends of the deceased in the midst of the great loss that they and the department have sustained. His funeral was held on Staten Island on November 13, 2019.

We honor you, Andrew Gargiulo.

– Fire News story and photo submitted by Mark Little courtesy of the New York Association of Fire Chaplains
#Repost @https://firenews.com/fdnys-andrew-s-gargiulo/

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #911 #fallenhero #post9-11illness
...

Six months after the attacks on America‚ CBS air Six months after the attacks on America‚ CBS aired a special that provided a glimpse into what occurred inside the towers. Amidst a crowd of firefighters in the lobby of the North Tower‚ the camera zooms in on Battalion Chief Richard Prunty. The voice of French filmmaker Jules Naudet remarks‚ ‘There’s Chief Prunty. Great guy – white hair‚ mustache. The perfect kind of grandfather that you would like to have.’ Husband to Susan‚ father to Christopher and Lisa‚ Rich would have been a superb grandfather.

After graduating from Alfred State Tech in 1963 with an AA in Applied Science‚ Rich performed electrical work for the New York Subway system. For nearly 2 years (1966-1967)‚ he served in South Korea during the Vietnam War‚ maintaining the radars and radios within the demilitarized zone‚ or ‘Freedom’s Frontier’ as Rich referred to it in jest.

In November 1968‚ he joined the Fire Department. Later‚ in 1978 he graduated cum laude with a Bachelor of Science degree from NYIT (New York Institute of Technology). Rich served nearly 33 years – first as firefighter‚ then Lieutenant‚ then Captain‚ finally Battalion Chief. Each promotion required intense studies to pass difficult tests.

Rich was a quiet gentleman‚ but he chose his words carefully‚ and – when produced – his smile and laughter were endearing. His appearance was somewhat gruff at first glance‚ but Rich was always there to lend help and kindness – to anyone.

His last sacrifice was true to his nature – to the nature of most everyone who serves their community or nation. 

While still in radio contact with fellow trapped firefighters‚ Rich managed to relay his final message: ‘Please tell my wife and children that I love them very much.’

We honor you, Richard Prunty.

By Lisa Prunty 
#Repost @https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/richard-a-prunty/ 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #veteran #kia #fallenhero #911

Six months after the attacks on America‚ CBS aired a special that provided a glimpse into what occurred inside the towers. Amidst a crowd of firefighters in the lobby of the North Tower‚ the camera zooms in on Battalion Chief Richard Prunty. The voice of French filmmaker Jules Naudet remarks‚ ‘There’s Chief Prunty. Great guy – white hair‚ mustache. The perfect kind of grandfather that you would like to have.’ Husband to Susan‚ father to Christopher and Lisa‚ Rich would have been a superb grandfather.

After graduating from Alfred State Tech in 1963 with an AA in Applied Science‚ Rich performed electrical work for the New York Subway system. For nearly 2 years (1966-1967)‚ he served in South Korea during the Vietnam War‚ maintaining the radars and radios within the demilitarized zone‚ or ‘Freedom’s Frontier’ as Rich referred to it in jest.

In November 1968‚ he joined the Fire Department. Later‚ in 1978 he graduated cum laude with a Bachelor of Science degree from NYIT (New York Institute of Technology). Rich served nearly 33 years – first as firefighter‚ then Lieutenant‚ then Captain‚ finally Battalion Chief. Each promotion required intense studies to pass difficult tests.

Rich was a quiet gentleman‚ but he chose his words carefully‚ and – when produced – his smile and laughter were endearing. His appearance was somewhat gruff at first glance‚ but Rich was always there to lend help and kindness – to anyone.

His last sacrifice was true to his nature – to the nature of most everyone who serves their community or nation.

While still in radio contact with fellow trapped firefighters‚ Rich managed to relay his final message: ‘Please tell my wife and children that I love them very much.’

We honor you, Richard Prunty.

By Lisa Prunty
#Repost @https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/richard-a-prunty/

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #veteran #kia #fallenhero #911
...

Memorial Day 2021. We will never forget. 🇺🇸 Memorial Day 2021.  We will never forget. 🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸

Memorial Day 2021. We will never forget. 🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸 ...

Battalion Chief Richard A. Prunty (Rich) Six mon Battalion Chief Richard A. Prunty (Rich) 

Six months after the attacks on America‚ CBS aired a special that provided a glimpse into what occurred inside the towers. Amidst a crowd of firefighters in the lobby of the North Tower‚ the camera zooms in on Battalion Chief Richard Prunty. The voice of French filmmaker Jules Naudet remarks‚ ‘There’s Chief Prunty. Great guy – white hair‚ mustache. The perfect kind of grandfather that you would like to have.’ Husband to Susan‚ father to Christopher and Lisa‚ Rich would have been a superb grandfather.

After graduating from Alfred State Tech in 1963 with an AA in Applied Science‚ Rich performed electrical work for the New York Subway system. For nearly 2 years (1966-1967)‚ he served in South Korea during the Vietnam War‚ maintaining the radars and radios within the demilitarized zone‚ or ‘Freedom’s Frontier’ as Rich referred to it in jest.

In November 1968‚ he joined the Fire Department. Later‚ in 1978 he graduated cum laude with a Bachelor of Science degree from NYIT (New York Institute of Technology). Rich served nearly 33 years – first as firefighter‚ then Lieutenant‚ then Captain‚ finally Battalion Chief. Each promotion required intense studies to pass difficult tests.

Rich was a quiet gentleman‚ but he chose his words carefully‚ and – when produced – his smile and laughter were endearing. His appearance was somewhat gruff at first glance‚ but Rich was always there to lend help and kindness – to anyone.

His last sacrifice was true to his nature – to the nature of most everyone who serves their community or nation. 

While still in radio contact with fellow trapped firefighters‚ Rich managed to relay his final message: ‘Please tell my wife and children that I love them very much.’

We honor you, Richard Prunty.

By Lisa Prunty 
#Repost @https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/richard-a-prunty/ 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #veteran #kia #fallenhero #911

Battalion Chief Richard A. Prunty (Rich)

Six months after the attacks on America‚ CBS aired a special that provided a glimpse into what occurred inside the towers. Amidst a crowd of firefighters in the lobby of the North Tower‚ the camera zooms in on Battalion Chief Richard Prunty. The voice of French filmmaker Jules Naudet remarks‚ ‘There’s Chief Prunty. Great guy – white hair‚ mustache. The perfect kind of grandfather that you would like to have.’ Husband to Susan‚ father to Christopher and Lisa‚ Rich would have been a superb grandfather.

After graduating from Alfred State Tech in 1963 with an AA in Applied Science‚ Rich performed electrical work for the New York Subway system. For nearly 2 years (1966-1967)‚ he served in South Korea during the Vietnam War‚ maintaining the radars and radios within the demilitarized zone‚ or ‘Freedom’s Frontier’ as Rich referred to it in jest.

In November 1968‚ he joined the Fire Department. Later‚ in 1978 he graduated cum laude with a Bachelor of Science degree from NYIT (New York Institute of Technology). Rich served nearly 33 years – first as firefighter‚ then Lieutenant‚ then Captain‚ finally Battalion Chief. Each promotion required intense studies to pass difficult tests.

Rich was a quiet gentleman‚ but he chose his words carefully‚ and – when produced – his smile and laughter were endearing. His appearance was somewhat gruff at first glance‚ but Rich was always there to lend help and kindness – to anyone.

His last sacrifice was true to his nature – to the nature of most everyone who serves their community or nation.

While still in radio contact with fellow trapped firefighters‚ Rich managed to relay his final message: ‘Please tell my wife and children that I love them very much.’

We honor you, Richard Prunty.

By Lisa Prunty
#Repost @https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/richard-a-prunty/

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #veteran #kia #fallenhero #911
...

The joy of being the older brother is that you can The joy of being the older brother is that you can do whatever you want simply because you're older. Or at least that's the way James Parham, 33, used to justify the pranks he pulled on his younger brother. "When I was about 7 he got me to stick a coat hanger in the light socket," said Kevin Parham. "All I remember was the hallway looking blue to me and him sitting there tickled to death."

Of course, not all the pranks between the two were so painful. The boys would race one another home from school determined to win control of the television. But big brother always managed to come out on top, mainly because of a scheme. "He'd take the knob off the television so that even if I beat him, I couldn't turn to my channel," Kevin Parham said. "It was stuck on his show, 'Little House on the Prairie.' "

But Mr. Parham the prankster eventually became Mr. Parham the proud United States marine, the proud father of a 3-year- old, Resa, and the respected law enforcement officer. Shortly before he disappeared, he had been promoted to an academy instructor for the Port Authority. "He had so much to be proud of," Kevin Parham said. "But he'd give up everything to help somebody. He was always on the job."

We honor you, James Parham.

Profile published in THE NEW YORK TIMES on November 6, 2001. #Repost @http://www.legacy.com/Sept11/Story.aspx?PersonID=128624 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #LEO #veteran #Marines #kia #fallenhero #911

The joy of being the older brother is that you can do whatever you want simply because you're older. Or at least that's the way James Parham, 33, used to justify the pranks he pulled on his younger brother. "When I was about 7 he got me to stick a coat hanger in the light socket," said Kevin Parham. "All I remember was the hallway looking blue to me and him sitting there tickled to death."

Of course, not all the pranks between the two were so painful. The boys would race one another home from school determined to win control of the television. But big brother always managed to come out on top, mainly because of a scheme. "He'd take the knob off the television so that even if I beat him, I couldn't turn to my channel," Kevin Parham said. "It was stuck on his show, 'Little House on the Prairie.' "

But Mr. Parham the prankster eventually became Mr. Parham the proud United States marine, the proud father of a 3-year- old, Resa, and the respected law enforcement officer. Shortly before he disappeared, he had been promoted to an academy instructor for the Port Authority. "He had so much to be proud of," Kevin Parham said. "But he'd give up everything to help somebody. He was always on the job."

We honor you, James Parham.

Profile published in THE NEW YORK TIMES on November 6, 2001. #Repost @http://www.legacy.com/Sept11/Story.aspx?PersonID=128624

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #LEO #veteran #Marines #kia #fallenhero #911
...

Louis Arena is one of several firefighters from La Louis Arena is one of several firefighters from Ladder 5, Manhattan, who disappeared into the rubble Tuesday while working to save countless others. His death, which was confirmed yesterday, occurred as he climbed the stairs in the North Tower of the World Trade Center looking for anyone who needed help.

"He was running up the stairs when other people were running down," said his wife of six years, Wanda (Reynolds) Arena. "It's so typical of him. He was always helping people. He was not concerned about himself."

Arena was born in Besonhurst, Brooklyn, and his family moved to the Heartland Village section of New Springville when he was four.

He was a graduate of St. Joseph by-the-Sea High School, Huguenot, and was a parishioner of St. Patrick's R.C. Church, Richmond.

A firefighter for six years, Arena first served at Ladder 5 before working out of Ladder 225 in East New York and Engine Company 309 in Brooklyn. He returned to Ladder 5 about two years ago.

"He was very dedicated to his (fire) house and loved everybody there," said Ms. Arena. "It was his second home."

An Emergency Medical Service technician, Ms. Arena worked a full shift Tuesday in Manhattan after the disaster, keeping a watchful eye out for her husband. "I knew he was with such a wonderful team," she said. "They were smart and they were strong and I really thought they were going to make it."

Ms. Arena said her husband was a gourmet cook who also could build or repair anything. He did countless favors for family and friends, even scheduling his days off so that he could help others.

He also loved spending time with his children, Nina, 4, and Joseph, 3.

"He was very protective of everyone," said Ms. Arena-Eisinger, "especially his kids."

We honor you, Louis Arena.

#Repost @https://www.silive.com/september-11/2010/09/louis_arena_32_firefighter_who.html 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #911

Louis Arena is one of several firefighters from Ladder 5, Manhattan, who disappeared into the rubble Tuesday while working to save countless others. His death, which was confirmed yesterday, occurred as he climbed the stairs in the North Tower of the World Trade Center looking for anyone who needed help.

"He was running up the stairs when other people were running down," said his wife of six years, Wanda (Reynolds) Arena. "It's so typical of him. He was always helping people. He was not concerned about himself."

Arena was born in Besonhurst, Brooklyn, and his family moved to the Heartland Village section of New Springville when he was four.

He was a graduate of St. Joseph by-the-Sea High School, Huguenot, and was a parishioner of St. Patrick's R.C. Church, Richmond.

A firefighter for six years, Arena first served at Ladder 5 before working out of Ladder 225 in East New York and Engine Company 309 in Brooklyn. He returned to Ladder 5 about two years ago.

"He was very dedicated to his (fire) house and loved everybody there," said Ms. Arena. "It was his second home."

An Emergency Medical Service technician, Ms. Arena worked a full shift Tuesday in Manhattan after the disaster, keeping a watchful eye out for her husband. "I knew he was with such a wonderful team," she said. "They were smart and they were strong and I really thought they were going to make it."

Ms. Arena said her husband was a gourmet cook who also could build or repair anything. He did countless favors for family and friends, even scheduling his days off so that he could help others.

He also loved spending time with his children, Nina, 4, and Joseph, 3.

"He was very protective of everyone," said Ms. Arena-Eisinger, "especially his kids."

We honor you, Louis Arena.

#Repost @https://www.silive.com/september-11/2010/09/louis_arena_32_firefighter_who.html

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #911
...

James P. Leahy learned responsibility at a tragica James P. Leahy learned responsibility at a tragically early age. A New York City police officer, he was 13 and the eldest of five children when his father, a Parks and Recreation Department employee, was murdered while on duty at a city golf course.

Officer Leahy, 38, became the head of his family then and there, said Officer Tim Duffy, a colleague at the Sixth Precinct in Greenwich Village. His youngest sister, Danielle, describes James Leahy as the only father she knew, from the time she was a toddler until he walked her down the aisle.

Losing his father shaped Officer Leahy's devotion to his own family: his childhood sweetheart and wife, Marcela, and his sons, James Jr., 18, Danny, 13, and John, 6. To ensure his children's educations, he worked two part-time jobs, as a security guard at New York University and at a J. C. Penney store near his Staten Island home.

He coached his sons in football and was always on the sidelines for their Little League games. A die-hard Pittsburgh Steelers fan, Officer Leahy fulfilled a dream by taking his boys to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Ohio last summer for the induction of Lynn Swann, his favorite player.

We honor you, James Leahy.

Profile published in THE NEW YORK TIMES on December 31, 2001. #Repost @http://www.legacy.com/Sept11/Story.aspx?PersonID=122579 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #LEO #kia #fallenhero #911

James P. Leahy learned responsibility at a tragically early age. A New York City police officer, he was 13 and the eldest of five children when his father, a Parks and Recreation Department employee, was murdered while on duty at a city golf course.

Officer Leahy, 38, became the head of his family then and there, said Officer Tim Duffy, a colleague at the Sixth Precinct in Greenwich Village. His youngest sister, Danielle, describes James Leahy as the only father she knew, from the time she was a toddler until he walked her down the aisle.

Losing his father shaped Officer Leahy's devotion to his own family: his childhood sweetheart and wife, Marcela, and his sons, James Jr., 18, Danny, 13, and John, 6. To ensure his children's educations, he worked two part-time jobs, as a security guard at New York University and at a J. C. Penney store near his Staten Island home.

He coached his sons in football and was always on the sidelines for their Little League games. A die-hard Pittsburgh Steelers fan, Officer Leahy fulfilled a dream by taking his boys to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Ohio last summer for the induction of Lynn Swann, his favorite player.

We honor you, James Leahy.

Profile published in THE NEW YORK TIMES on December 31, 2001. #Repost @http://www.legacy.com/Sept11/Story.aspx?PersonID=122579

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #LEO #kia #fallenhero #911
...

This error message is only visible to WordPress admins

Error: API requests are being delayed for this account. New posts will not be retrieved.

Log in as an administrator and view the Instagram Feed settings page for more details.

Financial Assistance
Additional Assistance #211
Medical or Other Services Link
Fund a Project Link
Privacy Policy