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our impact

Honor365 creates lasting impact on the lives of veterans, first responders, and their families in the areas of employment, education, healthcare, and housing. Our mission is to provide resource and referral services to those we serve in order to work towards our vision of a world without suicide. This is accomplished through our organization working with multiple, vetted providers who are a resource to those we serve. Individuals and families who contact our organization will be referred to organizations and companies who assist in the Honor365 pillar areas. In the event you need assistance, contact us. We honor you, and we want the best for you and your family.

EDUCATION

Honor365 partners and collaborates with education institutions and existing programs to help veterans and first responders to reach their education goals and to address their health. Contact us to receive additional information about programs, particularly related to education and outpatient therapy. We can assist you with connecting to programs that support your education goals. Additionally, if you would like to be part of a research program to address reducing PTSD, and receive outpatient therapy free of charge, we will help you with the referral process.

EMPLOYMENT

Honor365 is providing resource and referral services for veterans and first responders to obtain gainful employment. We work with vetted employment providers to help those we serve access employment services. We understand that transitions can be stressful, and we can help refer individuals to resources that are helpful. Contact us for more information.

HEALTHCARE

Honor365 is partnered with private industry and public institutions to provide free services for outpatient therapy for veterans, first responders, and their families. We encourage individuals, family members, and/or friends to contact us for additional information. If you would like to support the mental wellness of those we serve, please considering donate to our cause. Every contribution counts.

HOUSING

Honor365 is partnered with companies to help veterans and first responders locate affordable housing while improving the needs of their home, if needed. Robin’s Tool Bin, is an Honor365 program that has a box trailer loaded with equipment to help with small maintenance projects and repairs. Additionally, we work with corporations who would like to volunteer to support our efforts. Contact us to receive additional information.

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Employment for veterans were unemployed in November 2020

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The percentage of full-time student veterans who dropped out of college of enrollment in 2017.

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In 2019, there was a 2.1% decrease in the estimated number of homeless veterans nationwide. 793 veterans now have shelter.

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During a 20-year period, the total suicide rate in the United States increased 35% from 10.5% per 100,000 in 1999 to 14.2% per 100,000 per 100,000 in 2018.

Retired Detective Ronald Richards, 45, of the NYPD Retired Detective Ronald Richards, 45, of the NYPD bomb squad, died Sunday after a long, 9/11-related illness.

Richards was assigned to Emergency Service Truck 5 in Staten Island on 9/11 and he responded when the planes struck the World Trade Center.

He was trapped in a collapsed garage for hours before he could dig out himself and others who were trapped with him. Afterward, he worked at the site and at the Staten Island landfill for months.

Richards was transferred to the bomb squad in February 2002, where he was later promoted to second grade.

He was diagnosed with multiple myeloma in 2007, and was forced to retire in 2008.

The hero detective is survived by his wife of 17 years, Millie, and four daughters, Tyla, 17, Madison, 15, Makayla, 9, and Chloe, 8, plus his father, Ronald, a retired correction officer, and his mother, Clare.

We honor you, Ronald Richards.

#Repost @https://nypost.com/2015/10/12/retired-detective-dies-from-911-related-illness/ 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #LEO #kia #fallenhero #9-11 #post9-11illness

Retired Detective Ronald Richards, 45, of the NYPD bomb squad, died Sunday after a long, 9/11-related illness.

Richards was assigned to Emergency Service Truck 5 in Staten Island on 9/11 and he responded when the planes struck the World Trade Center.

He was trapped in a collapsed garage for hours before he could dig out himself and others who were trapped with him. Afterward, he worked at the site and at the Staten Island landfill for months.

Richards was transferred to the bomb squad in February 2002, where he was later promoted to second grade.

He was diagnosed with multiple myeloma in 2007, and was forced to retire in 2008.

The hero detective is survived by his wife of 17 years, Millie, and four daughters, Tyla, 17, Madison, 15, Makayla, 9, and Chloe, 8, plus his father, Ronald, a retired correction officer, and his mother, Clare.

We honor you, Ronald Richards.

#Repost @https://nypost.com/2015/10/12/retired-detective-dies-from-911-related-illness/

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #LEO #kia #fallenhero #9-11 #post9-11illness
...

Gerald T. Atwood was a member of the Sons of the A Gerald T. Atwood was a member of the Sons of the American Legion Squadron 1060 in Brooklyn, NY. He was a firefighter with Engine 34, Ladder 21. He was an eight year veteran of the FDNY working out of Hell’s Kitchen.

He grew up in the Old Mill Basin neighborhood of Brooklyn. He graduated from South Shore High School and spent two years at Kingsborough Community College. Earlier he ran a renovation business with his brother.

His wife Barbara said he possessed an infectious laugh. “He liked simple things, doing projects, sharing tools, helping neighbors with their houses. Or he’d go on trips with his brothers, fishing trips.” He had a wide range of interests and a retentive memory. “He’d read the paper and know everything in it, from politics to sports,” she said.

At the time of his death, he was survived by his wife Barbara, his son Gerald, 2, and his daughter Margaret, 1. Another child was as yet unborn at the time of his passing. Also surviving were his parents, Gerald and Elaine; brothers John, Raymond and Gregory, and sisters Jane and Elaine. (source Newsday.com)

It could be said that Gerald Atwood’s life ended on September 11, 2001.

I prefer to say that he continues to live and that his life continues.

His life is reflected by the way his children live their lives. Had he remained on earth to see his children grow and progress and become energetic, contributing members of society, it would be said of him “your children have learned what you lived.”

So can it be said still. It is not how we die that makes us heroic. 

It is how we live.

We honor you, Gerald Atwood.

#Repost @https://ldspatriot.wordpress.com/2006/09/11/2996-project-911-tribute-to-gerald-t-atwood/ 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11

Gerald T. Atwood was a member of the Sons of the American Legion Squadron 1060 in Brooklyn, NY. He was a firefighter with Engine 34, Ladder 21. He was an eight year veteran of the FDNY working out of Hell’s Kitchen.

He grew up in the Old Mill Basin neighborhood of Brooklyn. He graduated from South Shore High School and spent two years at Kingsborough Community College. Earlier he ran a renovation business with his brother.

His wife Barbara said he possessed an infectious laugh. “He liked simple things, doing projects, sharing tools, helping neighbors with their houses. Or he’d go on trips with his brothers, fishing trips.” He had a wide range of interests and a retentive memory. “He’d read the paper and know everything in it, from politics to sports,” she said.

At the time of his death, he was survived by his wife Barbara, his son Gerald, 2, and his daughter Margaret, 1. Another child was as yet unborn at the time of his passing. Also surviving were his parents, Gerald and Elaine; brothers John, Raymond and Gregory, and sisters Jane and Elaine. (source Newsday.com)

It could be said that Gerald Atwood’s life ended on September 11, 2001.

I prefer to say that he continues to live and that his life continues.

His life is reflected by the way his children live their lives. Had he remained on earth to see his children grow and progress and become energetic, contributing members of society, it would be said of him “your children have learned what you lived.”

So can it be said still. It is not how we die that makes us heroic.

It is how we live.

We honor you, Gerald Atwood.

#Repost @https://ldspatriot.wordpress.com/2006/09/11/2996-project-911-tribute-to-gerald-t-atwood/

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11
...

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — Firefighter Arthur T. Barr STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — Firefighter Arthur T. Barry enjoyed his freedom. The 35-year-old spent much of his youth zooming across the American continent on many road trips, all the way to California.

Last year he took a 10,000-mile motorcycle tour diagonally through Canada to Fairbanks, Alaska, and then returned across the northern United States. It took him about a month to eat all that road.

But Mr. Barry's triumphant adventures came to a tragic end on Sept. 11. The lifelong resident of Westerleigh, a member of Lower Manhattan's Ladder Co. 15, was on vacation that day. Mr. Barry, who was a handy mechanic, rode the Staten Island Ferry into the city just to drop off a heavy-duty machine at his firehouse near the South Street Seaport.

Arriving after the company had responded to the attack on the World Trade Center's Tower 1, he found a friend, Firefighter Eric Olsen, and the two of them walked to the scene of the disaster.

Mr. Barry, who remains among the missing, was last seen entering the first tower that was struck. 

His sister, Dr. Patricia A. Barry Cosgrove, and her husband, Dr. John Cosgrove, also responded to the tragic event by administering to the survivors and the rescuers.

Mr. Barry joined the Fire Department in 1993 and was first assigned to Ladder Co. 118 in Brooklyn. He transferred to Ladder Co. 15 a year later. Before the Fire Department, he worked as an elevator mechanic for Advance Elevator, New Brunswick, N.J., and a machine-tool technician for A-1 Machine and Tool Co., Elizabeth, N.J. 

He enjoyed swimming and not only went on road trips, but often flew to many destinations all over the country.

We honor you, Arthur Barry.

#Repost @https://www.silive.com/september-11/2010/09/arthur_barry_35_firefighter_tr.html 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — Firefighter Arthur T. Barry enjoyed his freedom. The 35-year-old spent much of his youth zooming across the American continent on many road trips, all the way to California.

Last year he took a 10,000-mile motorcycle tour diagonally through Canada to Fairbanks, Alaska, and then returned across the northern United States. It took him about a month to eat all that road.

But Mr. Barry's triumphant adventures came to a tragic end on Sept. 11. The lifelong resident of Westerleigh, a member of Lower Manhattan's Ladder Co. 15, was on vacation that day. Mr. Barry, who was a handy mechanic, rode the Staten Island Ferry into the city just to drop off a heavy-duty machine at his firehouse near the South Street Seaport.

Arriving after the company had responded to the attack on the World Trade Center's Tower 1, he found a friend, Firefighter Eric Olsen, and the two of them walked to the scene of the disaster.

Mr. Barry, who remains among the missing, was last seen entering the first tower that was struck.

His sister, Dr. Patricia A. Barry Cosgrove, and her husband, Dr. John Cosgrove, also responded to the tragic event by administering to the survivors and the rescuers.

Mr. Barry joined the Fire Department in 1993 and was first assigned to Ladder Co. 118 in Brooklyn. He transferred to Ladder Co. 15 a year later. Before the Fire Department, he worked as an elevator mechanic for Advance Elevator, New Brunswick, N.J., and a machine-tool technician for A-1 Machine and Tool Co., Elizabeth, N.J.

He enjoyed swimming and not only went on road trips, but often flew to many destinations all over the country.

We honor you, Arthur Barry.

#Repost @https://www.silive.com/september-11/2010/09/arthur_barry_35_firefighter_tr.html

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11
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Honor365 is honoring and remembering those directl Honor365 is honoring and remembering those directly impacted by September 11, 2001 to commemorate the 20th Anniversary this year.  From 9/11/20 through 9/11/2021 we invite you to never forget by reading the stories about amazing individuals that we have posted about on our Honor365 Facebook, Instagram, and website.  We are always “Remembering the One, Remembering Them All.” #honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #veteran #firstresponder #fallenhero #September11 #WTC #NYPD #FDNY
Honor365.org 🇺🇸

Honor365 is honoring and remembering those directly impacted by September 11, 2001 to commemorate the 20th Anniversary this year. From 9/11/20 through 9/11/2021 we invite you to never forget by reading the stories about amazing individuals that we have posted about on our Honor365 Facebook, Instagram, and website. We are always “Remembering the One, Remembering Them All.” #honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #veteran #firstresponder #fallenhero #September11 #WTC #NYPD #FDNY
Honor365.org 🇺🇸
...

The Honor365 9/11 Exhibit nationwide tour is start The Honor365 9/11 Exhibit nationwide tour is starting next week and we are honored to showcase the 9/11 replica model created by Daan Van Der Steijn of the World Trade Center plaza to commemorate the 20th Anniversary of 9/11.  Visit honor365.org/911Exhibit to make plans to visit the exhibit at a city near you 🇺🇸 #honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingthemall #September11 #WTC #NYPD #FDNY #PortAuthority #redroofinn #psitops #fallenheronetwork #ushonorflag

The Honor365 9/11 Exhibit nationwide tour is starting next week and we are honored to showcase the 9/11 replica model created by Daan Van Der Steijn of the World Trade Center plaza to commemorate the 20th Anniversary of 9/11. Visit honor365.org/911Exhibit to make plans to visit the exhibit at a city near you 🇺🇸 #honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingthemall #September11 #WTC #NYPD #FDNY #PortAuthority #redroofinn #psitops #fallenheronetwork #ushonorflag ...

Firefighting wasn’t Paul Keating’s first calli Firefighting wasn’t Paul Keating’s first calling. He bounced from job to job before entering the New York City Fire Department. But it became his passion. Keating, 38, was counted a hero even before Sept. 11. Soon after his 1995 graduation from the academy he rescued a drowning man from the ocean at Spring Lake, N.J. Known as “Paulie” by his comrades, Keating was stationed at Ladder Co. 5 in SoHo. He was in his apartment near the World Trade Center when the first plane hit Tower One, and didn’t hesitate to race to the scene.

We honor you, Paul Keating.

#Repost @http://bravestmemorial.net/html/members/keating_paul_fr_l005.html 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11

Firefighting wasn’t Paul Keating’s first calling. He bounced from job to job before entering the New York City Fire Department. But it became his passion. Keating, 38, was counted a hero even before Sept. 11. Soon after his 1995 graduation from the academy he rescued a drowning man from the ocean at Spring Lake, N.J. Known as “Paulie” by his comrades, Keating was stationed at Ladder Co. 5 in SoHo. He was in his apartment near the World Trade Center when the first plane hit Tower One, and didn’t hesitate to race to the scene.

We honor you, Paul Keating.

#Repost @http://bravestmemorial.net/html/members/keating_paul_fr_l005.html

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11
...

Meet Lane Harper, Executive Director of the Power Meet Lane Harper, Executive Director of the Power of Life Foundation in Birmingham, AL.

Harper is a critically acclaimed actor in an off-Broadway stage play, and the movie “Justice on Trial: The Movie,” where he portrays civil rights activist, Medgar Evers. Harper’s main passion is giving back. He attended Alabama State University majoring in Criminal Justice. Harper holds a Black Belt in Karate, teaches self-defense classes and provides security training to law enforcement organizations and private entities around the country. Harper is currently a police officer and serves as an Instructor/Trainer for the Birmingham Police Department. He has served in the law enforcement field for over 20 years. 

After years of funding his own acts of service, Harper created The Power of Life Foundation, a nonprofit organization, to expand his mission to provide basic human needs to people who are in need nationwide. The Power of Life Foundation services those in need of help with housing, food, clothing/shoes, disaster relief and youth development.
Since the pandemic began, the Foundation’s mission has been converted to a new life saving initiative, “It’s COOL to be Covered.” This initiative hosts Drive Thru Free Face Mask & Free Food Giveaway events aimed at encouraging the youth and the public to wear face masks while in public, to help reduce the spread of the virus in their surrounding community.

To date the Foundation has given away more than 100,000 free reusable cloth face masks and over 120,000 pounds of food across the southeast United States.

Harper has been recognized for his works and his Foundation’s efforts by several media outlets for his acts of kindness and support in the community. In November 2019, Lane Harper received the Wettermark Keith First Responder Hero Award. In 2020, he received a COVID-19 Hero Award.

We honor you, Lane Harper.

#Submission by: Teresa Berger.

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #LEO

Meet Lane Harper, Executive Director of the Power of Life Foundation in Birmingham, AL.

Harper is a critically acclaimed actor in an off-Broadway stage play, and the movie “Justice on Trial: The Movie,” where he portrays civil rights activist, Medgar Evers. Harper’s main passion is giving back. He attended Alabama State University majoring in Criminal Justice. Harper holds a Black Belt in Karate, teaches self-defense classes and provides security training to law enforcement organizations and private entities around the country. Harper is currently a police officer and serves as an Instructor/Trainer for the Birmingham Police Department. He has served in the law enforcement field for over 20 years.

After years of funding his own acts of service, Harper created The Power of Life Foundation, a nonprofit organization, to expand his mission to provide basic human needs to people who are in need nationwide. The Power of Life Foundation services those in need of help with housing, food, clothing/shoes, disaster relief and youth development.
Since the pandemic began, the Foundation’s mission has been converted to a new life saving initiative, “It’s COOL to be Covered.” This initiative hosts Drive Thru Free Face Mask & Free Food Giveaway events aimed at encouraging the youth and the public to wear face masks while in public, to help reduce the spread of the virus in their surrounding community.

To date the Foundation has given away more than 100,000 free reusable cloth face masks and over 120,000 pounds of food across the southeast United States.

Harper has been recognized for his works and his Foundation’s efforts by several media outlets for his acts of kindness and support in the community. In November 2019, Lane Harper received the Wettermark Keith First Responder Hero Award. In 2020, he received a COVID-19 Hero Award.

We honor you, Lane Harper.

#Submission by: Teresa Berger.

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #LEO
...

Allan Tarasiewicz, FDNY, Rescue 5, was killed on Allan Tarasiewicz, FDNY, Rescue 5,  was killed on September 11, 2001. 

At 5 feet, 6 inches, Allan Tarasiewicz, 45, was the shortest man in Staten Island’s Rescue Co. 5, so short the rest of the guys built him a little booster step so he could climb into the rig. Plus, that name – who could pronounce it? They gave up and called him “Taz.” But if Taz took a lot of teasing, he dished it right back, said Patricia Tarasiewicz, his wife of 24 years.

Her favorite revenge story was the time he prepared chicken cutlets for everyone in the firehouse. When one of the men complained about how tough his was, he found out he was eating a breaded, fried, dirty old sponge. “He was the crazy man of the firehouse,” his wife said with satisfaction.

A Navy man’s daughter, she fell in love at first sight when she spotted the young Marine at a base in Italy and decided he was the sexiest man she’d ever seen. She wed him soon after in a military ceremony at Governor’s Island, and had his two kids, Allan Jr., now 23, and Melissa, 20. She followed him to jobs in California and Colorado before he landed with the fire department 11 years ago. His wife says the men of Rescue 5 were always very close.

When the fire department called on Sept. 10 to inform Allan Tarasiewicz that he had to work the next day — a day he planned to stay home — the Staten Island resident accepted the news. Getting calls for mandatory overtime was just part of being a firefighter. When not on duty, Tarasiewicz, a former Marine, also enjoyed scuba diving.

We honor you, Allan Tarasiewicz. 

#Repost @https://wodwell.com/wod/allan-tarasiewicz/ 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #veteran #Marines #kia #fallenhero #9-11

Allan Tarasiewicz, FDNY, Rescue 5, was killed on September 11, 2001.

At 5 feet, 6 inches, Allan Tarasiewicz, 45, was the shortest man in Staten Island’s Rescue Co. 5, so short the rest of the guys built him a little booster step so he could climb into the rig. Plus, that name – who could pronounce it? They gave up and called him “Taz.” But if Taz took a lot of teasing, he dished it right back, said Patricia Tarasiewicz, his wife of 24 years.

Her favorite revenge story was the time he prepared chicken cutlets for everyone in the firehouse. When one of the men complained about how tough his was, he found out he was eating a breaded, fried, dirty old sponge. “He was the crazy man of the firehouse,” his wife said with satisfaction.

A Navy man’s daughter, she fell in love at first sight when she spotted the young Marine at a base in Italy and decided he was the sexiest man she’d ever seen. She wed him soon after in a military ceremony at Governor’s Island, and had his two kids, Allan Jr., now 23, and Melissa, 20. She followed him to jobs in California and Colorado before he landed with the fire department 11 years ago. His wife says the men of Rescue 5 were always very close.

When the fire department called on Sept. 10 to inform Allan Tarasiewicz that he had to work the next day — a day he planned to stay home — the Staten Island resident accepted the news. Getting calls for mandatory overtime was just part of being a firefighter. When not on duty, Tarasiewicz, a former Marine, also enjoyed scuba diving.

We honor you, Allan Tarasiewicz.

#Repost @https://wodwell.com/wod/allan-tarasiewicz/

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #veteran #Marines #kia #fallenhero #9-11
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