George Skypeck

2017-12-06 Skypeck

I was that which others did not want to be.
I went where others feared to go, and did what others failed to do.
I asked nothing from those who gave nothing, and reluctantly accepted the thought of eternal loneliness … should I fail.
I have seen the face of terror; felt the stinging cold of fear; and enjoyed the sweet taste of a moment’s love.
I have cried, pained, and hoped … but most of all, I have lived times others would say were best forgotten.
At least someday I will be able to say that I was proud of what I was … a soldier.

SKY, a native of Massachusetts, is one of America’s most prominent military-historical commemorative artists. His name is a registered trademark.

Among nations and places displaying his original artworks and prints are the French Airborne Museum at Ste-Mer-Eglise, Normandy; the Pentagon in Washington; the Korean War Veterans Commission and Ministry of Defense in Seoul, Republic of Korea; Luxembourg; Canberra, Australia, Returned Servicemen’s League Headquarters; the U.S. Naval Academy, Air Force Academy, West Point; the Soldier & Sailors Museum, Buffalo, NY; Arlington National Cemetery; and many military stations at home and abroad. His famous poem Soldier graces several state monuments to honor veterans of all wars and conflicts. His latest painting, Assured Victory… A 09-11-2001 And War On Terrorism Memorial, was loaned for display at Arlington National Cemetery since December, 2001, in honor of the American sacrifices on that day at the Pentagon and New York City World Trade Center terrorists’ attacks and the War on Terrorism in Afghanistan, Iraq and worldwide by U.S. military and civilian forces.

SKY has received several awards and commendations for his military service, and for his artwork from various public, private and governmental sectors, the most prestigious being the award of the Military Order of the Purple Heart’s George Washington Medallion of Merit, joining such recipients as Presidents Johnson, Reagan, George Bush Senior, Senator Bob Dole and actor Bob Hope.

SKY is a combat-wounded and disabled Vietnam Veteran having risen to the rank of Captain from Private in the U.S. Army and holds the coveted Combat Infantryman’s Badge, two Bronze Stars, Meritorious Service Medal, three Air Medals, Purple Heart and several foreign awards to include the Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry medal, Wound medal and Honor medal (First Class). He served two combat tours as a special warfare and senior intelligence advisor from 1967-71 in isolated outposts. During the Tet Offensive of 1968 battle in Ben-Tre, his outpost coined the famous quote “We had to destroy the town to save it… !” His last assignment on active duty with the Army Recruiting Command in Boston, Massachusetts, was to design and conduct John Wayne’s internationally famous arrival into Harvard Square, Cambridge, Massachusetts, atop an M-113 armored personnel carrier as a public support event with the Harvard’s Lampoon and Hasty Pudding Club. After release from active duty, he attended the University of Massachusetts at Boston and Amherst earning a Bachelor in Political Science and a Master in Public Administration and attended MIT for special graduate studies in Arms Control and Defense Planning. He studied art at the Corcoran Museum in Washington and had a studio in the Stars & Stripes newspaper building. He is the creator of the Coors Combat Art collection, co-creator of the Coors Scholarship Fund for veterans’ dependents and the newly published Coors book of his artworks, The Defenders Of Freedom. He is a resident artist member of the famous Society of Illustrators of New York City.

Mr. Skypeck was recently presented with the Blinded American Veterans Foundation Communications and Media award at a reception in Congress’ Committee on Veterans Affairs Committee room. Mr. Skypeck was inducted into the US Army Field Artillery Officer Candidate School Hall Of Fame in 2006 for his veterans’ work and artwork contributions to America. He is also a recipient of the University of Massachusetts’ “125 Alumni to Watch” Award.

We honor you, George Skypeck.

(#Repost @International War Veterans Poetry Archives)

 

 

Capt Warren H. Berg

2017-10-19 Berg

In 1941, Warren graduated from Mankato State Teachers’ College (now Minnesota State University-Mankato) with a bachelor’s degree in education, intending to become a college professor. He completed a year of graduate work at the University of Minnesota, but World War II then dramatically altered his career plans. He enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps (now U.S. Air Force) and was called to active duty in November 1942. Warren graduated at the top of his Navigator Training School class at Mather Field in Sacramento, CA, in 1943 and was assigned to the Eighth Air Force, 96th Bomb Group, at Snetterton Heath, England. After 30 bombing missions over Europe, the crew of his B-17, The Reluctant Dragon, developed a reputation for being lucky. The 11 other crews that had reported for combat duty at the same time had been shot down. Warren and his crewmates signed up for a second tour, eventually leading as many as 1,000 B-17s and B-24s to German targets. But their luck ran out on mission No. 36 on Jan. 13, 1945. They were shot down over Bischofsheim, Germany. Six of 10 crew members bailed out at 24,000 feet and survived, but they were taken prisoner. On April 29, 1945, Gen. George Patton and his Third Army liberated Stalag 7A near Moosburg, and soon 1st Lieutenant Berg was headed home. He was promoted to Captain and awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal with six Oak-Leaf Clusters. The experiences of his B-17 crew are among those recounted in the book ‘D-Day Bombers: The Veterans’ Story’ by Stephen Darlow.

Later that year, Warren began a 38- year career with Trans World Airlines in Kansas City when he was hired as a navigation instructor. He and Genevieve, who he had known since high school, married on April 27, 1946, and spent almost all their married life in Kansas City, North. Warren retired in 1983 as Director of Flight Operations Ground Training for all TWA pilots and flight engineers. He also had supervised the safety training of flight attendants. His various administrative positions over the years necessitated considerable world travel. He served on the training committee of the International Air Transport Association, wrote numerous training manuals used in the airline industry and audited training procedures for Ethiopian and Saudi Arabian airlines. Upon his retirement, he was honored as a leader in airline training by the Boeing Aircraft Flight Crew Training Center and Delta, American and United Airlines.

We honor you, Warren Berg.

(#Repost @Together We Served)

RDML John Delmond McCubbin

2017-9-3 McCubbin

John McCubbin graduated from the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, New London, Connecticut, Class of 1939. He retired as a U.S. Coast Guard Rear Admiral in 1973.

John was awarded with the Air Medal for meritorious achievement as Patrol Plane Commander in Patrol Squadron SIX, operating out of BW-1, Greenland, and Argentia, Naval Air Field, on extensive anti-submarine and convoy coverage flights under hazardous weather conditions in the North Atlantic regions off Labrador and Greenland, from December 1943 to April 1944.

We honor you, John McCubbin.

(#Repost @Hall of Valor)