Ten4 Responding means we have a mutual understanding, and Honor365 is responding to the suicide epidemic in the nation among our veterans, first responders, and their families.  Our message is, “From Darkness Light Prevails.”  An annual gala and additional benefit events are held to raise funds for mental wellness and resiliency programs.  Proceeds from these events benefit local communities.

 Hashtags:  #ten4responding #t4r #fromdarknesslightprevails

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Sept 27, Hildale UT/ Colorado City, AZ

November 2, Second Annual Ten4 Responding Gala, Salt Lake City, UT

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2020

Event

November 7, Second Annual T4R Gala, Salt Lake City, UT

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Despite his busy life in the Navy, CDR Patrick Dun Despite his busy life in the Navy, CDR Patrick Dunn, 39, and his wife were in constant communication. The morning of September 11, he kissed Stephanie, 31, who was two months pregnant with their first child, before leaving for work at the Pentagon. Then, for the first time, he kissed her stomach, too.

He telephoned later to tell of the terrorist attacks in New York City. After the Pentagon was hit, when he didn’t call back, something told her quickly, starkly, and clearly that he was gone. 

On Sunday, as she sat in the living room of their Springfield town house wearing her husband’s sapphire Naval Academy ring on a necklace, she spoke of life married to a sailor. “Pat’s favorite thing was to be at sea,” Stephanie said, “He loved to be at sea. He... absolutely loved it. His home was at sea. If the ship was rocking, he was happy.... It was in his blood.”

Pat, the son of a Newark policeman, came from a Navy family. His father served in World War II and the Korean War; Pat and one of his brothers were Naval Academy graduates. He had just come off several long deployments when they met at a sports bar in Alexandria, she remembered, four years ago last week. But he also was fascinated with the lore and excitement of the Pentagon, where he worked as a planner and strategist, and where he was when the hijacked Boeing 757 airliner smashed into the Navy Command Center on September 11.

“It was like almost part of me left,” Stephanie said of the moment when she learned of the Pentagon attack. “I covered my mouth and I screamed, ‘No!’ It’s like my body knew, and I don’t know how to describe it... But part of me left with him. I knew right away – my life had just changed.” CDR Dunn was buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

We honor you, Patrick Dunn.

#Repost @https://www.pentagonmemorial.org/explore/biographies/cdr-patrick-dunn-usn 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #veteran #navy #kia #fallenhero #9-11

Despite his busy life in the Navy, CDR Patrick Dunn, 39, and his wife were in constant communication. The morning of September 11, he kissed Stephanie, 31, who was two months pregnant with their first child, before leaving for work at the Pentagon. Then, for the first time, he kissed her stomach, too.

He telephoned later to tell of the terrorist attacks in New York City. After the Pentagon was hit, when he didn’t call back, something told her quickly, starkly, and clearly that he was gone.

On Sunday, as she sat in the living room of their Springfield town house wearing her husband’s sapphire Naval Academy ring on a necklace, she spoke of life married to a sailor. “Pat’s favorite thing was to be at sea,” Stephanie said, “He loved to be at sea. He... absolutely loved it. His home was at sea. If the ship was rocking, he was happy.... It was in his blood.”

Pat, the son of a Newark policeman, came from a Navy family. His father served in World War II and the Korean War; Pat and one of his brothers were Naval Academy graduates. He had just come off several long deployments when they met at a sports bar in Alexandria, she remembered, four years ago last week. But he also was fascinated with the lore and excitement of the Pentagon, where he worked as a planner and strategist, and where he was when the hijacked Boeing 757 airliner smashed into the Navy Command Center on September 11.

“It was like almost part of me left,” Stephanie said of the moment when she learned of the Pentagon attack. “I covered my mouth and I screamed, ‘No!’ It’s like my body knew, and I don’t know how to describe it... But part of me left with him. I knew right away – my life had just changed.” CDR Dunn was buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

We honor you, Patrick Dunn.

#Repost @https://www.pentagonmemorial.org/explore/biographies/cdr-patrick-dunn-usn

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #veteran #navy #kia #fallenhero #9-11
...

Matthew Ryan had two loves in his life‚ his fami Matthew Ryan had two loves in his life‚ his family and the fire department. He was a loving husband‚ father‚ grandfather‚ son‚ brother and friend. 

When Matty returned from Vietnam‚ he met Margaret across a crowded room. They became soul mates and best friends and were married shortly afterwards. He attended St. Francis College‚ working nights to help support them.

Upon graduation‚ Matty joined the Fire Department of New York. He served 18 of his 28-year career in Engine 280‚ both as a firefighter and captain. Matty studied hard and rose through the ranks‚ finally being promoted to Battalion Chief almost exactly one year before September 11th. Many firemen and officers in all ranks respected him as ‘a Fireman’s Fireman.’ His strong sense of duty and responsibility gave everyone in the firehouse confidence when ‘Matty was on duty.’ He was often found‚ even in the heat of a big fire‚ whispering in a younger fireman’s ear‚ giving him instructions and keeping him calm. If he was injured‚ he never complained‚ and most of the time‚ the firemen with him never knew until after he went to the hospital. It was those character traits that made everyone admire and love him.

Matthew Ryan was a man of many different loves and interests that made him the man he was. He was very proud of being Irish and epitomized all the best qualities of an Irishman. His greatest passions were hockey‚ music and his newspapers. Matty played hockey with FDNY leagues for 26 years and made numerous friends. His favorite time was a Sunday evening sitting in the living room – simultaneously watching hockey on TV‚ listening to his favorite radio show and reading his newspaper. ‘T’was heaven’ to him.

-Margaret Ryan 

We honor you, Matthew Ryan.

#Repost @https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/matthew-l-ryan/ 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #veteran #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11

Matthew Ryan had two loves in his life‚ his family and the fire department. He was a loving husband‚ father‚ grandfather‚ son‚ brother and friend.

When Matty returned from Vietnam‚ he met Margaret across a crowded room. They became soul mates and best friends and were married shortly afterwards. He attended St. Francis College‚ working nights to help support them.

Upon graduation‚ Matty joined the Fire Department of New York. He served 18 of his 28-year career in Engine 280‚ both as a firefighter and captain. Matty studied hard and rose through the ranks‚ finally being promoted to Battalion Chief almost exactly one year before September 11th. Many firemen and officers in all ranks respected him as ‘a Fireman’s Fireman.’ His strong sense of duty and responsibility gave everyone in the firehouse confidence when ‘Matty was on duty.’ He was often found‚ even in the heat of a big fire‚ whispering in a younger fireman’s ear‚ giving him instructions and keeping him calm. If he was injured‚ he never complained‚ and most of the time‚ the firemen with him never knew until after he went to the hospital. It was those character traits that made everyone admire and love him.

Matthew Ryan was a man of many different loves and interests that made him the man he was. He was very proud of being Irish and epitomized all the best qualities of an Irishman. His greatest passions were hockey‚ music and his newspapers. Matty played hockey with FDNY leagues for 26 years and made numerous friends. His favorite time was a Sunday evening sitting in the living room – simultaneously watching hockey on TV‚ listening to his favorite radio show and reading his newspaper. ‘T’was heaven’ to him.

-Margaret Ryan

We honor you, Matthew Ryan.

#Repost @https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/matthew-l-ryan/

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #veteran #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11
...

Mike Kehoe was a 33-year-old firefighter who was c Mike Kehoe was a 33-year-old firefighter who was captured in one of the most famous photographs of 9/11 as he attempted to go up the stairs while everyone headed in the opposite direction -- down to safety. Mike miraculously managed to escape the North Tower right before it collapsed.

After the buildings collapsed, Mike worked 10 hour shifts to help recover his missing comrades. He later recounted in an interview with The Mirror, “Sure I was frightened – but I was just doing my job and wish we could have done more.”

We honor you, Mike Kehoe.

#Repost @https://www.giveitlove.com/the-incredible-heroes-of-911/9/?firefox=1&Exc_D_LessThanPoint002_p1=1 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #9-11

Mike Kehoe was a 33-year-old firefighter who was captured in one of the most famous photographs of 9/11 as he attempted to go up the stairs while everyone headed in the opposite direction -- down to safety. Mike miraculously managed to escape the North Tower right before it collapsed.

After the buildings collapsed, Mike worked 10 hour shifts to help recover his missing comrades. He later recounted in an interview with The Mirror, “Sure I was frightened – but I was just doing my job and wish we could have done more.”

We honor you, Mike Kehoe.

#Repost @https://www.giveitlove.com/the-incredible-heroes-of-911/9/?firefox=1&Exc_D_LessThanPoint002_p1=1

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #9-11
...

From his father:

At age 18‚ Gerard joined the National Guard; at 27‚ after attending the Military Academy in New Jersey‚ he became a Second Lieutenant in the Reserve and was stationed in Long Island and then in New York City at the 69th Military Infantry. At 30‚ he graduated from the Fire Academy and became a Firefighter.

Gerard loved sports. He was so very good at baseball‚ that his friends called him Reggy after the famous Reggy Jackson.

Gerard was an animal lover. He often carried treats with him to give to dogs that walked past his ladder 9 firehouse in Great Jones Street located in East Greenwich Village in New York City and strangely enough those dogs became to know Gerard and to look for him when he wasn’t around. That is why at the Firehouse‚ they called him ‘Biscuits’‚ because of the biscuits he carried in his pockets to treat his friends. When that catastrophe happened‚ the dog owners cried when they knew Gerard was missing.

Gerard adored kids‚ even though he didn’t have his own yet. He usually was the first to meet them when they visit the firehouse. He made himself joyfully available to respond to the many questions posed by kids about the Firehouse‚ the Fire trucks‚ the ‘rigs’‚ as they call them and all other equipment around.

I would appreciate‚ if possible‚ to put by his name:

‘Serving the people was his calling in life. He was happy as a soldier serving his country. He was also happy as a Firefighter serving his city.’

We still feel the terrible pain and the profound sadness for the loss of our son Gerard. At the same time‚ as a father I have that sense of pride that Gerard knowing of the danger‚ did not hesitate to reach to the highest point to give comfort and show the way out of this inferno to so many people.

We honor you, Gerard Baptiste.

#Repost @https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/gerard-baptiste/

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #veteran #Army #kia #fallenhero #9-11
...

Willie Q. Troy has voice mail messages he will nev Willie Q. Troy has voice mail messages he will never retrieve. Family members and friends frantically tried to contact him by cell phone as news of the attack on the Pentagon became widely publicized. But he never called back. 

Willie was born the fifth of six children on March 20, 1950 to Mrs. Bessie Mae Troy and the late Mr. John Troy in Delco, North Carolina. He was active in the school band and was able to play various instruments with minimal instruction. His talent so impressed the bandleader that he would frequently ask Willie to teach the class. 

Upon graduation from West Columbus High School in 1968, he moved to Washington, DC to find better employment opportunities. However, he was drafted by the United States Army in 1970 and served in Vietnam as a guard to General Abrams. Although he was wounded during the course of his tour, he stayed in Vietnam until his assignment was completed. 

During his time in combat, Willie and his childhood sweetheart, Judy, wrote letters to each other on a daily basis. They were married three days after his return to North Carolina. Shortly afterward, the family was stationed at White Sands Missile Range in White Sands, New Mexico where their daughter, ReNee, was born. 

The events of September 11th, 2001 changed [things] forever. He will be missed by all those whose lives he touched, whether it was a kind word or caring gesture. He left an impression on everyone he met. Judy is thinking of keeping his cell phone in service so she can call to hear his voice saying, “I’m unavailable right now, but leave your name and number, and I’ll get back with you as soon as I can.” Nothing could be more true. 

We honor you, Willie Troy.

#Repost @https://pentagonmemorial.org/explore/biographies/ssg-willie-q-troy-usa-retired 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #veteran #army #kia #fallenhero #9-11

Willie Q. Troy has voice mail messages he will never retrieve. Family members and friends frantically tried to contact him by cell phone as news of the attack on the Pentagon became widely publicized. But he never called back.

Willie was born the fifth of six children on March 20, 1950 to Mrs. Bessie Mae Troy and the late Mr. John Troy in Delco, North Carolina. He was active in the school band and was able to play various instruments with minimal instruction. His talent so impressed the bandleader that he would frequently ask Willie to teach the class.

Upon graduation from West Columbus High School in 1968, he moved to Washington, DC to find better employment opportunities. However, he was drafted by the United States Army in 1970 and served in Vietnam as a guard to General Abrams. Although he was wounded during the course of his tour, he stayed in Vietnam until his assignment was completed.

During his time in combat, Willie and his childhood sweetheart, Judy, wrote letters to each other on a daily basis. They were married three days after his return to North Carolina. Shortly afterward, the family was stationed at White Sands Missile Range in White Sands, New Mexico where their daughter, ReNee, was born.

The events of September 11th, 2001 changed [things] forever. He will be missed by all those whose lives he touched, whether it was a kind word or caring gesture. He left an impression on everyone he met. Judy is thinking of keeping his cell phone in service so she can call to hear his voice saying, “I’m unavailable right now, but leave your name and number, and I’ll get back with you as soon as I can.” Nothing could be more true.

We honor you, Willie Troy.

#Repost @https://pentagonmemorial.org/explore/biographies/ssg-willie-q-troy-usa-retired

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #veteran #army #kia #fallenhero #9-11
...

Some firefighters so crave the thrill of the job t Some firefighters so crave the thrill of the job that they dread retirement. Lt. Joseph P. Gullickson was not among them.

He treasured the camaraderie at Ladder Company 101 in Red Hook, Brooklyn, and welcomed the challenges of the work, ascending to the rank of lieutenant at age 31 and, until Sept. 11, studying for the captain's test.

But Lieutenant Gullickson, 37, was concerned about his safety, particularly now that Amanda, almost 4, and Isabel, 20 months, were in the picture. Lately, he had been increasingly devoted to the lawn sprinkler company that he and his brother Ralph inherited from their father. When the company finished a major project at the American Museum of Natural History last year, Lieutenant Gullickson was elated.

At home in Staten Island, he would nestle into the blue satin Daddy Chair with the gold polka dots, cuddling with the girls and devouring American history books.

After dinner, the lieutenant and his wife, Naoemi, who shared his love of "The Honeymooners" and Barry White and had caught his fever for Frank Sinatra, would seat the girls in strollers and amble through the neighborhood. 

We honor you, Joseph Gullickson.

#Repost @http://www.legacy.com/Sept11/Story.aspx?PersonID=146337  Photo @https://wodwell.com/wod/joseph-gullickson/ 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11

Some firefighters so crave the thrill of the job that they dread retirement. Lt. Joseph P. Gullickson was not among them.

He treasured the camaraderie at Ladder Company 101 in Red Hook, Brooklyn, and welcomed the challenges of the work, ascending to the rank of lieutenant at age 31 and, until Sept. 11, studying for the captain's test.

But Lieutenant Gullickson, 37, was concerned about his safety, particularly now that Amanda, almost 4, and Isabel, 20 months, were in the picture. Lately, he had been increasingly devoted to the lawn sprinkler company that he and his brother Ralph inherited from their father. When the company finished a major project at the American Museum of Natural History last year, Lieutenant Gullickson was elated.

At home in Staten Island, he would nestle into the blue satin Daddy Chair with the gold polka dots, cuddling with the girls and devouring American history books.

After dinner, the lieutenant and his wife, Naoemi, who shared his love of "The Honeymooners" and Barry White and had caught his fever for Frank Sinatra, would seat the girls in strollers and amble through the neighborhood.

We honor you, Joseph Gullickson.

#Repost @http://www.legacy.com/Sept11/Story.aspx?PersonID=146337 Photo @https://wodwell.com/wod/joseph-gullickson/

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11
...

Honor365 is honoring and remembering those directl Honor365 is honoring and remembering those directly impacted by September 11, 2001 to commemorate the 20th Anniversary that is happening in 2021.  From 9/11/20 through 9/11/2021 we invite you to never forget by reading the stories about amazing individuals that we have posted about on our Honor365 Facebook, Instagram, and our website.  We are always “Remembering the One, Remembering Them All.” #honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #veteran #firstresponder #fallenhero #September11
Honor365.org 🇺🇸

Honor365 is honoring and remembering those directly impacted by September 11, 2001 to commemorate the 20th Anniversary that is happening in 2021. From 9/11/20 through 9/11/2021 we invite you to never forget by reading the stories about amazing individuals that we have posted about on our Honor365 Facebook, Instagram, and our website. We are always “Remembering the One, Remembering Them All.” #honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #veteran #firstresponder #fallenhero #September11
Honor365.org 🇺🇸
...

Whenever the alarm rang at the Ladder Company 20 f Whenever the alarm rang at the Ladder Company 20 firehouse on Lafayette Street, David J. LaForge — a big, quiet fireman with a thick mustache — always headed for the same spot: the driver's seat. Foot to the floor, corners taken with finesse, he would get everybody to the scene in no time flat. "He was like Dale Earnhardt," said Bobby Barrett, who steered the back of the company's ladder truck while Firefighter LaForge handled the front.

It was a talent that began when he was very young, pedaling a miniature fire engine around his family's home in Staten Island, and that accelerated when he got a job crisscrossing the country for North American Van Lines in one of their 18-wheel rigs. So naturally he wanted to become a driver — in Fire Department parlance, the chauffeur — when he joined the department 24 years ago.

"He liked to go fast," said his sister, Jane A. Schwerd, adding that off duty, his chariot was a black Pontiac Firebird Firehawk with a stick shift. "He would sit there and study maps of the city so he would know the way to go."

No one else in their family had been a firefighter, but the life seemed to suit her brother, who was 50 years old and lived in Staten Island. He was forever helping neighbors, an elderly uncle and others. "He was the one who everybody called upon," she said. "And he always answered the call." 

We honor you, David LaForge.

#Repost @http://www.legacy.com/Sept11/Story.aspx?PersonID=151814 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11

Whenever the alarm rang at the Ladder Company 20 firehouse on Lafayette Street, David J. LaForge — a big, quiet fireman with a thick mustache — always headed for the same spot: the driver's seat. Foot to the floor, corners taken with finesse, he would get everybody to the scene in no time flat. "He was like Dale Earnhardt," said Bobby Barrett, who steered the back of the company's ladder truck while Firefighter LaForge handled the front.

It was a talent that began when he was very young, pedaling a miniature fire engine around his family's home in Staten Island, and that accelerated when he got a job crisscrossing the country for North American Van Lines in one of their 18-wheel rigs. So naturally he wanted to become a driver — in Fire Department parlance, the chauffeur — when he joined the department 24 years ago.

"He liked to go fast," said his sister, Jane A. Schwerd, adding that off duty, his chariot was a black Pontiac Firebird Firehawk with a stick shift. "He would sit there and study maps of the city so he would know the way to go."

No one else in their family had been a firefighter, but the life seemed to suit her brother, who was 50 years old and lived in Staten Island. He was forever helping neighbors, an elderly uncle and others. "He was the one who everybody called upon," she said. "And he always answered the call."

We honor you, David LaForge.

#Repost @http://www.legacy.com/Sept11/Story.aspx?PersonID=151814

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #firefighter #kia #fallenhero #9-11
...

Joe died at the age of 39 during the terrorist att Joe died at the age of 39 during the terrorist attack on the Pentagon. Joe is buried at the BG William C. Doyle's Veteran Cemetery, Wrightstown, NJ Section N, Site 00003. 

Joe enlisted in the Navy at Newark, N.J. on June 24th, 1980 and went through the Recruit Training Command in Great Lakes, Ill. from June 1980 through August 1980. From boot camp, Joe served as a Boatswain's Mate aboard the USS William S. Sims (FF 1059) from January 1982 through July 1983. He then served aboard the USS Seattle (AOE 3) from January 1984 through October 1985. 

Finally seeing the light, Joe decided to become an AW. After training he flew as an acoustic sensor operator with Patrol Squadron Eight from December 1986 through June 1991. It was during this tour that Joe was advanced to AW1 on December 16, 1988.

From VP-8, Joe headed to the Navy Recruiting District Philadelphia from September 1991 through October 1996. To survive five years as a recruiter says a lot about Joe's professionalism.  Joe headed back to sea duty, first attending CV-TSC training at Fleet Combat Training Center Atlantic in Dam Neck, Va. from March 1997 through May 1997. From there, he headed to Norfolk to serve on the USS George Washington (CVN 73) from May 1997 through February 1999. 

His last command would be working for the Chief of Naval Operations in the Pentagon beginning in March 1999.

We honor you, Joe Pycior Jr.

#Repost @https://www.njrunforthefallen.org/aw1-joseph-john-pycior-jr.html 

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #veteran #navy #kia #fallenhero #9-11

Joe died at the age of 39 during the terrorist attack on the Pentagon. Joe is buried at the BG William C. Doyle's Veteran Cemetery, Wrightstown, NJ Section N, Site 00003.

Joe enlisted in the Navy at Newark, N.J. on June 24th, 1980 and went through the Recruit Training Command in Great Lakes, Ill. from June 1980 through August 1980. From boot camp, Joe served as a Boatswain's Mate aboard the USS William S. Sims (FF 1059) from January 1982 through July 1983. He then served aboard the USS Seattle (AOE 3) from January 1984 through October 1985.

Finally seeing the light, Joe decided to become an AW. After training he flew as an acoustic sensor operator with Patrol Squadron Eight from December 1986 through June 1991. It was during this tour that Joe was advanced to AW1 on December 16, 1988.

From VP-8, Joe headed to the Navy Recruiting District Philadelphia from September 1991 through October 1996. To survive five years as a recruiter says a lot about Joe's professionalism. Joe headed back to sea duty, first attending CV-TSC training at Fleet Combat Training Center Atlantic in Dam Neck, Va. from March 1997 through May 1997. From there, he headed to Norfolk to serve on the USS George Washington (CVN 73) from May 1997 through February 1999.

His last command would be working for the Chief of Naval Operations in the Pentagon beginning in March 1999.

We honor you, Joe Pycior Jr.

#Repost @https://www.njrunforthefallen.org/aw1-joseph-john-pycior-jr.html

#honor365 #rememberingtheone #rememberingtheonerememberingthemall #veteran #navy #kia #fallenhero #9-11
...

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