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The officer who lost his life on 5/27/20 has been The officer who lost his life on 5/27/20 has been identified as Officer Cody Holte of the Grand Forks Police Department. Officer Holte was also a First Lieutenant in the North Dakota National Guard.  We honor you, Cody Holte.  #honor365 #rememberingtheone #army #leo

The officer who lost his life on 5/27/20 has been identified as Officer Cody Holte of the Grand Forks Police Department. Officer Holte was also a First Lieutenant in the North Dakota National Guard. We honor you, Cody Holte. #honor365 #rememberingtheone #army #leo ...

So cool to watch history with the SpaceX and NASA So cool to watch history with the SpaceX and NASA launch today.  Godspeed gentleman and return home safely 🚀❤️🇺🇸

So cool to watch history with the SpaceX and NASA launch today. Godspeed gentleman and return home safely 🚀❤️🇺🇸 ...

Master Sgt. David Royer stopped a gunman in Leaven Master Sgt. David Royer stopped a gunman in Leavenworth, Kansas, on May 27, 2020. (Photo courtesy KMBC via CNN.). The heroic soldier who rammed a gunman with his truck in Kansas is a combat veteran and military police officer who is assigned to one of the two military prisons at Fort Leavenworth, according to the Army.  Master Sergeant David Royer, 34, is being hailed for his quick action on Wednesday when he stopped an active shooter on the city of Leavenworth’s Centennial Bridge.  Royer later told media that he was speaking to his fiancé on a speaker phone when the gunman got out of his vehicle and opened fire at other vehicles in the bridge with a rifle. “I assessed the situation very quickly, looked around and just took the only action possible that I felt I could take,” Royer told reporters during a press conference on Thursday.

Facing an active shooter and with countless lives on the line, Royer counter-attacked. “I accelerated my truck as quickly as possible and struck the active shooter and pinned him underneath my truck,” Royer told reporters.  The suspect was arrested by police shortly thereafter. 
Another soldier who was shot during the incident was listed in serious condition.

Royer joined the Army in January 2005 and then deployed to Iraq from July 2005 to July 2006, according to a statement from Fort Leavenworth.  He is currently assigned to 705th Military Police Battalion, 15 Military Police Brigade, and he is serving as the internment/resettlement non-commissioned officer at the Midwest Joint Regional Correctional Facility.

Royer is also a graduate of Drill Sergeant School, Air Assault School, and the Military Police Special Reaction Team Training Course. “I was shocked that it was happening, but the adrenaline took over and with the military training that I’ve received, I took appropriate action and took out the threat as fast as possible,” Royer said. (#Repost @Task And Purpose). #honor365 #rememberingtheone #army

Master Sgt. David Royer stopped a gunman in Leavenworth, Kansas, on May 27, 2020. (Photo courtesy KMBC via CNN.). The heroic soldier who rammed a gunman with his truck in Kansas is a combat veteran and military police officer who is assigned to one of the two military prisons at Fort Leavenworth, according to the Army. Master Sergeant David Royer, 34, is being hailed for his quick action on Wednesday when he stopped an active shooter on the city of Leavenworth’s Centennial Bridge. Royer later told media that he was speaking to his fiancé on a speaker phone when the gunman got out of his vehicle and opened fire at other vehicles in the bridge with a rifle. “I assessed the situation very quickly, looked around and just took the only action possible that I felt I could take,” Royer told reporters during a press conference on Thursday.

Facing an active shooter and with countless lives on the line, Royer counter-attacked. “I accelerated my truck as quickly as possible and struck the active shooter and pinned him underneath my truck,” Royer told reporters. The suspect was arrested by police shortly thereafter.
Another soldier who was shot during the incident was listed in serious condition.

Royer joined the Army in January 2005 and then deployed to Iraq from July 2005 to July 2006, according to a statement from Fort Leavenworth. He is currently assigned to 705th Military Police Battalion, 15 Military Police Brigade, and he is serving as the internment/resettlement non-commissioned officer at the Midwest Joint Regional Correctional Facility.

Royer is also a graduate of Drill Sergeant School, Air Assault School, and the Military Police Special Reaction Team Training Course. “I was shocked that it was happening, but the adrenaline took over and with the military training that I’ve received, I took appropriate action and took out the threat as fast as possible,” Royer said. (#Repost @Task And Purpose). #honor365 #rememberingtheone #army
...

Jefferson County Sheriff Zena Stephens says she’ Jefferson County Sheriff Zena Stephens says she’s excited to be the first Black female Sheriff in Texas, but it’s something she’s not too thrilled about.

Though she embraces the moniker of being the first, the newly elected sheriff remains hopeful that she won’t be the last. “The fact that I’m the first in 2017 is not a lot to be proud about in our country… really, “ says Stephens. “I am excited that I am the first. I think it’s important because the more people who look like us, who are professionals and can do a good job—it’s great to be that role model.” Prior to being sheriff, Stephens served as the first female Chief of Police at Prairie View A&M University. She’s also one of only two Black female Sheriffs in the country. “I hope to see a day where we don’t have to have that conversation – that there are a lot of professionals, whether they’re women or minorities,” says Stephens. “I just want people to go out and do a good job. I don’t want to be the first of anything – I want to be the best!” With almost 30 years of law enforcement experience, Stephens says she’s building a more diverse staff that reflects the communities they serve.

We honor you, Zena Stephens. (#Repost @https://www.houstonpublicmedia.org/articles/news/2017/05/08/199651/texas-first-black-female-sheriff-builds-diversity-within-a-political-divide/ )

#rememberingtheone #honor365 #breakingbarriers

Jefferson County Sheriff Zena Stephens says she’s excited to be the first Black female Sheriff in Texas, but it’s something she’s not too thrilled about.

Though she embraces the moniker of being the first, the newly elected sheriff remains hopeful that she won’t be the last. “The fact that I’m the first in 2017 is not a lot to be proud about in our country… really, “ says Stephens. “I am excited that I am the first. I think it’s important because the more people who look like us, who are professionals and can do a good job—it’s great to be that role model.” Prior to being sheriff, Stephens served as the first female Chief of Police at Prairie View A&M University. She’s also one of only two Black female Sheriffs in the country. “I hope to see a day where we don’t have to have that conversation – that there are a lot of professionals, whether they’re women or minorities,” says Stephens. “I just want people to go out and do a good job. I don’t want to be the first of anything – I want to be the best!” With almost 30 years of law enforcement experience, Stephens says she’s building a more diverse staff that reflects the communities they serve.

We honor you, Zena Stephens. (#Repost @https://www.houstonpublicmedia.org/articles/news/2017/05/08/199651/texas-first-black-female-sheriff-builds-diversity-within-a-political-divide/ )

#rememberingtheone #honor365 #breakingbarriers
...

🖤💙🖤 ...

Staff Sergeant Bryan Christopher Black died as a r Staff Sergeant Bryan Christopher Black died as a result of hostile fire while on a reconnaissance patrol on 04 Oct 2017. He was with the 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne) as a part of Africa: Operation Juniper Shield.

We honor you, Bryan Black. (#Repost @https://www.thepurpleheart.com/roll-of-honor/profile/default?rID=9c55804c-8a41-405a-839a-fe716da8b292 )

#rememberingtheone #honor365 #KIA #purpleheart

Staff Sergeant Bryan Christopher Black died as a result of hostile fire while on a reconnaissance patrol on 04 Oct 2017. He was with the 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne) as a part of Africa: Operation Juniper Shield.

We honor you, Bryan Black. (#Repost @https://www.thepurpleheart.com/roll-of-honor/profile/default?rID=9c55804c-8a41-405a-839a-fe716da8b292 )

#rememberingtheone #honor365 #KIA #purpleheart
...

For Josh Brunemeier, being a firefighter has meant For Josh Brunemeier, being a firefighter has meant helping the community beyond just putting out fires.

The Kiwanis Club of Corpus Christi gave Brunemeier the Firefighter of the Year Award during a luncheon at the Congressman Solomon P. Ortiz International Center.

Nominated and awarded by officials at the fire department, Brunemeier has consistently been a positive force in the community, said Fire Chief Robert Rocha.

Originally from California, Brunemeier moved here with his military family and has always held a deep respect for firefighters. "I have a sister that has Down syndrome, so growing up doing Special Olympics, seeing the firefighters always there to support and help, it always meant something," Brunemeier said. "So when my time in college came up, what I wanted to be was a no-brainer." Having studied at Texas A&M University Kingsville and Del Mar College, Brunemeier became a firefighter and paramedic in 2013 and recently celebrated five years.

Outside of his fire department duties, Brunemeier has sponsored numerous charity and volunteer events. He helped set up an Easter basket drive that collected over 200 baskets for kids earlier this year.

Brunemeier also volunteers with the Special Olympics and Toys for Tots yearly, among other fundraising for charities.

When asked about the moment Brunemeier "made the right decision," he recalled when he first started work for a refinery fire company. As a paramedic at the Corpus Christi Fire Department, one of the first calls he shadowed was to help a child. "When I got home I told my wife: This is what I want to do for the rest of my life. This is what I want to do for my career," Brunemeier said.

We honor you, Josh Brunemeier. (#Repost @https://www.caller.com/story/news/2018/09/13/kiwanis-club-and-fire-department-award-firefighter-year/1215429002/ )

#rememberingtheone #honor365

For Josh Brunemeier, being a firefighter has meant helping the community beyond just putting out fires.

The Kiwanis Club of Corpus Christi gave Brunemeier the Firefighter of the Year Award during a luncheon at the Congressman Solomon P. Ortiz International Center.

Nominated and awarded by officials at the fire department, Brunemeier has consistently been a positive force in the community, said Fire Chief Robert Rocha.

Originally from California, Brunemeier moved here with his military family and has always held a deep respect for firefighters. "I have a sister that has Down syndrome, so growing up doing Special Olympics, seeing the firefighters always there to support and help, it always meant something," Brunemeier said. "So when my time in college came up, what I wanted to be was a no-brainer." Having studied at Texas A&M University Kingsville and Del Mar College, Brunemeier became a firefighter and paramedic in 2013 and recently celebrated five years.

Outside of his fire department duties, Brunemeier has sponsored numerous charity and volunteer events. He helped set up an Easter basket drive that collected over 200 baskets for kids earlier this year.

Brunemeier also volunteers with the Special Olympics and Toys for Tots yearly, among other fundraising for charities.

When asked about the moment Brunemeier "made the right decision," he recalled when he first started work for a refinery fire company. As a paramedic at the Corpus Christi Fire Department, one of the first calls he shadowed was to help a child. "When I got home I told my wife: This is what I want to do for the rest of my life. This is what I want to do for my career," Brunemeier said.

We honor you, Josh Brunemeier. (#Repost @https://www.caller.com/story/news/2018/09/13/kiwanis-club-and-fire-department-award-firefighter-year/1215429002/ )

#rememberingtheone #honor365
...

It was after midnight on May 15, 1918 when William It was after midnight on May 15, 1918 when William Henry Johnson began to hear the rustling. Johnson was a long way from his home in Albany, New York, guarding a bridge in the Argonne Forest in Champagne, France. Sleeping next to him was Needham Roberts, a fellow soldier. Both men had enlisted in the New York National Guard just a few months earlier and were now part of the French Army, donated by U.S. forces to their understaffed allies in the thick of #WWI.

As Johnson continued hearing the strange noises late into the night, he urged his partner to get up. A tired Roberts waved him off, but Johnson decided to prepare himself just in case.

The rustling continued. At one point, Johnson heard a clipping noise—what he suspected was the sound of the perimeter fence being cut. He again told Roberts to wake up. 
The two began lobbing grenades into the darkness, hoping to discourage whoever might be lurking around the perimeter. Suddenly, in the middle of the French forest, Johnson saw dozens of German soldiers come charging, bayonets pointed toward him. They began to fire.

What transpired over the next hour would become an act of heroism that prompted President Theodore Roosevelt to declare Johnson one of the bravest Americans. 
Johnson may or may not have felt like a hero, though he certainly was. But he must have also felt something else—a sense of confusion. A man of color, he had been dispatched to a segregated regiment, where he received paltry combat training and was assigned menial tasks like unloading trucks. Even his homecoming parade was split up according to race. Henry Johnson, decorated virtually head to toe in French military honors, returned to a country that considered him both hero and a second-class citizen. 
We honor you, William Johnson. (#Repost @https://getpocket.com/explore/item/henry-johnson-the-one-man-army-who-fought-off-dozens-of-german-soldiers-during-world-war-i?utm_source=pocket-newtab )

#rememberingtheone #honor365 #medalofhonor

It was after midnight on May 15, 1918 when William Henry Johnson began to hear the rustling. Johnson was a long way from his home in Albany, New York, guarding a bridge in the Argonne Forest in Champagne, France. Sleeping next to him was Needham Roberts, a fellow soldier. Both men had enlisted in the New York National Guard just a few months earlier and were now part of the French Army, donated by U.S. forces to their understaffed allies in the thick of #WWI.

As Johnson continued hearing the strange noises late into the night, he urged his partner to get up. A tired Roberts waved him off, but Johnson decided to prepare himself just in case.

The rustling continued. At one point, Johnson heard a clipping noise—what he suspected was the sound of the perimeter fence being cut. He again told Roberts to wake up.
The two began lobbing grenades into the darkness, hoping to discourage whoever might be lurking around the perimeter. Suddenly, in the middle of the French forest, Johnson saw dozens of German soldiers come charging, bayonets pointed toward him. They began to fire.

What transpired over the next hour would become an act of heroism that prompted President Theodore Roosevelt to declare Johnson one of the bravest Americans.
Johnson may or may not have felt like a hero, though he certainly was. But he must have also felt something else—a sense of confusion. A man of color, he had been dispatched to a segregated regiment, where he received paltry combat training and was assigned menial tasks like unloading trucks. Even his homecoming parade was split up according to race. Henry Johnson, decorated virtually head to toe in French military honors, returned to a country that considered him both hero and a second-class citizen.
We honor you, William Johnson. (#Repost @https://getpocket.com/explore/item/henry-johnson-the-one-man-army-who-fought-off-dozens-of-german-soldiers-during-world-war-i?utm_source=pocket-newtab )

#rememberingtheone #honor365 #medalofhonor
...

We honor all who have come before and have sacrifi We honor all who have come before and have sacrificed so much on this Memorial Day 🇺🇸 #honor365 #rememberingtheone #memorialday

We honor all who have come before and have sacrificed so much on this Memorial Day 🇺🇸 #honor365 #rememberingtheone #memorialday ...

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