PVT Claire Martin

Martin

On April 25, 1951, his unit was ambushed as it pulled back from the Chinese attack near Chongpyong, South Korea. He was seriously wounded by a small arms bullet to his chest and died of those wounds on April 27, 1951 as he was being evacuated from a field hospital to a Mobile Army Surgical Hospital.

We honor you, Claire Martin.

(#Repost @National Purple Heart Hall of Honor)

LCpl Budd “Buddy” Michael Cote

2018-4-25 Cote

Budd M. Cote’ attended elementary, middle school and his freshman year of high school in Las Vegas, Nevada. His family relocated to Tucson, Arizona in 2001 due to his father’s employment. Budd was an avid hockey player since the early age of four years. He played all positions and became quite proficient while enjoying every game. Budd also ran track and field, cross country, and was very active in drama activities, photography and drawing free style sketches. Budd excelled at so many different aspects of the arts by playing guitar, singing in the choir, and enjoyed dancing. He loved all types of music and had a knack for knowing “which” band sang “which” song. In addition, Budd was active in martial arts and earned his black belt by the age of ten. One of the very best qualities he possessed was that he could make anyone laugh. He gave from the heart and compassion came naturally to him.

LCpl Budd M. Cote’ entered the USMC in July 2005 at MCRD in San Diego, California. He graduated from the Military Police Academy at Ft. Leonard Wood, Missouri and later trained as a Field Military Police Officer. He was assigned to the; Military Police, Marine Wing Support Squadron 373, Marine Wing Support Group 37, 3D Marine Air Wing, 1st Expeditionary Force-Forward (MWSS 373, MWSG 37, 3D MAW, 1 MEF.) and stationed at Marine Corps Air Station, Miramar, California. He deployed to Iraq in September 2006 where he provided convoy support and escorts near Fallujah. He was the driver of a Humvee, call sign “Havoc 2” and was killed when an improvised explosive device detonated on his convoy.

 

We honor you, Budd Cote.

(#Repost @American Legion Post 52)

Lt Tammie Jo Shults

U.S. Navy photo of Southwest Airlines pilot Tammie Jo Shults photo in 1992

Passengers aboard the tumultuous Southwest Airlines flight — during which one passenger was killed after nearly being ripped from the plane — are crediting pilot Tammie Jo Shults’ quick thinking with saving their lives.

The former Navy fighter pilot safely brought the plane down in Philadelphia after one of its engines exploded shortly after taking off from New York City.

“This is a true American Hero,” passenger Diana McBride Self said in a Facebook post about Shults, adding the pilot went back and personally spoke with passengers after the ordeal. “A huge thank you for her knowledge, guidance and bravery in a traumatic situation. God bless her and all the crew.”

But long before her quick-thinking maneuvers softly landed the damaged Southwest plane, Shults was a pioneer among female fighter pilots and faced resistance to even enlist.

Shults, raised on a New Mexico ranch, grew up dreaming of being a pilot as she watched planes fly overhead from the nearby Holloman Air Force Base, she recalled in a passage for the 2012 book “Military Fly Moms,” which profiled the careers of female pilots.

When she went to a retired military pilots lecture on career day her senior year of high school, the former colonel asked if she was lost.

“I mustered up the courage to assure him I was not and that I was interested in flying,” she wrote in a passage for the book. “He allowed me to stay but assured me there were no professional women pilots.”

A meeting with a female pilot while she was a junior at MidAmerican Nazarene University inspired her to keep at it.

“My heart jumped. Girls did fly!” she wrote in the book. “I set to work trying to break into the club.”

The Air Force rejected Shults, however — but wanted her brother. Shults toiled for a year until a recruiter processed her Navy application.

She met her husband — Dean Shults, who’s now also a Southwest pilot — during that time, who she described as her “knight in shining airplane.”

While Shults became one of the first women to fly the F/A-18, she recalled being relegated to support roles because female pilots couldn’t fly combat missions, she wrote in the book.

She retired in 1993, and lives with her husband and two children in San Antonio.

We honor you, Tammie Jo Shults.

(#Repost @American Military News)

SM 1 Douglas Albert Munro

2018-4-20 Munro

Of the 3,498 Medal of Honor recipients in American history, only one was from the U.S. Coast Guard: Signalman 1st Class Douglas Albert Munro. On this day 74 years ago, Munro sacrificed himself at the Matanikau River at Point Cruz in Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, while saving hundreds of his fellow service members.

In recognition, Munro was posthumously awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his “extraordinary heroism and conspicuous gallantry in action above and beyond the call of duty.” Munro remains the only member of the Coast Guard to earn this distinction.

Born in Vancouver, British Columbia, Munro grew up in South Cle Elum, Washington. He enlisted in the Coast Guard in 1939. Upon hearing that the Coast Guard had been ordered to man transport vessels in the Pacific during World War II, Munro pleaded with his executive officer to allow him to transfer to this mission. He was eventually successful and was assigned to transport duty supporting Marine landings at Guadalcanal during the Solomon Islands campaign.

On Sept. 27, 1942, nearly 500 Marines were tasked with crossing the Matanikau River at Point Cruz at Guadalcanal. However, the Marines faced imminent danger at the hands of a larger and more heavily armed than anticipated Japanese force.

Munro volunteered to lead the evacuation mission as the Marines were pinned in a vulnerable position by advancing Japanese forces. Munro led a group of small boats charged with protecting 24 Higgins landing craft that were attempting to extract the Marines.

As machine gun fire from the land continued, Munro positioned his Coast Guard craft between the Japanese and the Higgins boats to provide cover for the evacuation. Armed with only two small guns on his plywood boat, Munro successfully held off the Japanese attack, enabling nearly 500 Marines, including 25 wounded, to escape.

As the last Marines were safely under way and while turning back to rescue a grounded Higgins boat, Munro was fatally wounded. Still thinking of those Marines he was charged to protect, his final words were: “Did they get off?”

Munro exemplified the honor, valor, and patriotism that United States Coast Guard service men and women display in defending our nation’s waters. In honoring Munro, we recognize the Coast Guard’s vital role in protecting America’s maritime security.

Munro embodied the Coast Guard’s motto, semper paratus (“always ready”), in his heroic, decisive actions in Guadalcanal. Recognizing the crucial security the Coast Guard provides our nation, Congress and the president should strive to ensure this sea service remains always ready.

We honor you, Douglas Munro.

(#Repost @the Daily Signal)

WAC Alyce Dixon

2018-4-19 Dixon

Mrs. Dixon was working for the War Department’s secretarial pool at the newly constructed Pentagon in 1943 when she enlisted in the Women’s Auxiliary Army Corps, soon to be called the Women’s Army Corps.

She was initially limited to administrative assignments in Iowa and Texas. But in 1945, she joined the newly established 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion. The battalion was the only unit of black WACs to serve overseas in World War II and was led by Charity Adams, one of the first black female commissioned officers in the war.

The Army was segregated, and Mrs. Dixon’s battalion — made up of more than 800 African American woman and posted in England and France — dined and was housed separately from other WACs.

The 6888th was tasked with sorting and distributing what she estimated were billions of backlogged letters and packages to soldiers — a pileup attributed to the disruption in delivery caused by the Battle of the Bulge.

Their mission was deemed vital to sustaining morale on the front lines, but a significant hurdle was identifying a piece of mail’s ultimate destination based on incomplete information supplied by the sender.

“A lot of mothers wrote to ‘Buster, U.S. Army,’ or ‘Junior, U.S. Army,’ ” Mrs. Dixon told an Army publication. “We knew every service member had a number and we had difficulty finding them; however, we found every person. Also a lot of wives and sweethearts wrote to soldiers every day. There were stacks and stacks of mail we had to send back indicating deceased. That was sad.”

She added: “We had to fight mice and rats while sorting the mail. People down south from Alabama were sending fried chicken and bread to soldiers in France.”

Working three shifts a day, seven days a week, the battalion accomplished in three months what was projected by the brass to take half a year.

Mrs. Dixon returned to Washington in the late 1940s and worked for the Census Bureau and later the Pentagon, retiring in 1972 as a purchasing agent.

We honor you, Alyce Dixon .

(#Repost @The Washington Post)

SSgt R. Lee Ermey

2018-4-18 Ermey

In 1961, at age 17, Ermey enlisted in the United States Marine Corps and went through recruit training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego in San Diego, California. For his first few years, he served in the aviation support field before becoming a drill instructor in India Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, at Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, where he was assigned from 1965 to 1967.

Ermey then served in Marine Wing Support Group 17 at Marine Corps Air Station Futenma in Okinawa, Japan. In 1968, he was ordered to Vietnam with MWSG-17, and spent 14 months in country. The remainder of his service was on Okinawa where he was advanced to staff sergeant (E-6). He was medically discharged in 1972 because of several injuries incurred during his service. On May 17, 2002, he received an honorary promotion to gunnery sergeant (E-7) by the Commandant of the Marine Corps, General James L. Jones.

He is most well-known for playing Gunnery Sgt. Hartman in “Full Metal Jacket,” which earned him a Golden Globe Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor. Ermey appeared in more than 60 films, including Full Metal Jacket, Apocalypse Now, Purple Hearts, Mississippi Burning, The Siege of Firebase Gloria, Dead Man Walking, Se7en, Fletch Lives, Leaving Las Vegas, Prefontaine, Saving Silverman, On Deadly Ground, Sommersby, Life, Man of the House, Toy Soldiers and The Salton Sea, as well as the remake of Willard, and as an evil sadist in two The Texas Chainsaw Massacre films.

On Sunday [April 15, 2018], R. Lee Ermey’s long-time manager informed the world that a little after 6:30 p.m. EST, the beloved R. Lee Ermey “The Gunny” passed away in the morning due to complications from pneumonia.

We honor you, R. Lee Ermey.

(Submission by: Ninzel Rasmuson. #Repost @American Military News and Wikipedia)

GySgt Derik R. Holley

2018-4-17 Holley

Derik was born at Andrews Air Force Base, Camp Springs, MD on September 27, 1984 to Richard and Sylvia (Rockwell) Holley. He was a 2002 graduate of Westlake High School in Waldorf, MD. He joined the United States Marine Corps in November 2003, serving as a CH-53E Super Stallion crew chief his entire career. Derik deployed twice to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom, once to Japan as part of the Unit Deployment Program, and once with the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit. He died in a Marine Corps helicopter crash Tuesday, April 3, 2018 near El Centro, CA.

We honor you, Derik Holley.

(Submission by: Ninzel Rasmuson. #Repost @Dayton Daily News)