MAJ Richard “Dick” Winters

2018-4-7 Winters

Winters was born Jan. 21, 1918 and studied economics at Franklin & Marshall College before enlisting, according to a biography on the Penn State website.

Winters became the leader of Company E, 506th Regiment, 101st Airborne Division on D-Day, after the death of the company commander during the invasion of Normandy.

During that invasion, Winters led 13 of his men in destroying an enemy battery and obtained a detailed map of German defenses along Utah Beach. In September 1944, he led 20 men in a successful attack on a German force of 200 soldiers. Occupying the Bastogne area of Belgium at the time of the Battle of the Bulge, he and his men held their place until the Third Army broke through enemy lines, and Winters shortly afterward was promoted to major.

After returning home, Winters married his wife, Ethel, in May 1948, and trained infantry and Army Ranger units at Fort Dix during the Korean War. He started a company selling livestock feed to farmers, and he and his family eventually settled in a farmhouse in Hershey, Pa., where he retired.

Historian Stephen Ambrose interviewed Winters for the 1992 book “Band of Brothers,” upon which the HBO miniseries that started airing in September 2001 was based. Winters himself published a memoir in 2006 entitled “Beyond Band of Brothers.”

When people asked whether he was a hero, he echoed the words of his World War II buddy, Mike Ranney: “No, but I served in a company of heroes.”

William Guarnere, 88, said what he remembers about Winters was “great leadership. He was a good man, a very good man,” Guarnere said. “I would follow him to hell and back. So would the men from E Company.”

We honor you, Richard Winters.

(#Repost @Legacy.com)

2 thoughts on “MAJ Richard “Dick” Winters

  1. I recently found a tattered copy of Winter’s autobiography at a charity book sale. It is a fascinating read and gives insight into a brave and courageous man who also had a funny and tender side. Sleep well.

    Liked by 1 person

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